• OK, it's on.
  • Please note that many, many Email Addresses used for spam, are not accepted at registration. Select a respectable Free email.

Learning Guitar for INTPs

Sensi Star

Active Member
Joined
Sep 16, 2010
Messages
201
Location
USA
#1
I've been trying to learn guitar for quite a while now. I memorized some limited scales and my speed/technique is fairly decent. However, I just cannot grasp music theory / the formula of music. I think it's because of my over-analytical INTP logic.
Most teaching methods deal with one piece of information at a time--and rely on the student having faith that it will make sense eventually--but my logical mind demands to know how each fits into the larger picture and how it is a fragment of a consistent underlying pattern. I then end up being overwhelmed by this quest to identify the logic behind music, because there is so much variety within music; and there seem to be inconsistencies and concepts that don't make sense, leaving me "down the rabbit hole" trying to understand it all.

I'm wondering if there are any INTPs here that are progressing smoothly with learning guitar. I would like a reference to how they got on the right track, and which types of training (preferably available online) work best for the INTP mind. Any insight appreciated.
 

SpaceYeti

Prolific Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2010
Messages
5,600
Location
Crap
#2
I'm learning to play, also. I find that lessons are just plain difficult to pay attention to. They're boring. My favorite thing to do with my guitar is noodle. Nothing I'm aiming for, not trying to duplicate anything, though perhaps using something I just learned to see how it fits in. Besides that, just go. Just do your thing. Just makes notes happen.

If you're interested in more depth of understanding why your guitar's doing what it's doing and why what you're doing makes those particular noises, I would suggest simply studying the physical properties of noise and, specifically, resonance. Then, just translate that into the strings and notes you're making happen.

I find the most difficult part of playing guitar is remembering which string on certain frets are regular notes and which are sharp/flat. That's simply a memory thing, though. I'm sure I'll remember after playing for long enough.
 
Joined
Oct 27, 2010
Messages
204
Location
Israel
#3
I play the guitar 4 years now and here is what i suggest:

Don't try to figure it out, it will figure you out if you are persistent enough. Learn songs and eventually when you put your fingers to match the chords you will start seeing patterns by your own. If you memorize notes on each fret you'll even see sounds as letters and vice versa (but that's after awful lot of time).

Guitar learning was never smooth to me:
First few months i tried to learn with a teacher that told me to hold the guitar between my legs and I said "screw you prevert" and then I started the adventure by my own. First 6 months were the toughest, my friends all around me were progressing in an insane rate and I was left behind with some pathetic chords that I practiced - my jelousy thrived but I didn't let that stop me practicing the guitar. And so I went with practice - play the guitar atleast 4 times a week, and eventually the INTP in me screamed "Hey! What the hell man? Don't you see that pattern?! It's right in front of you man!" and so I tested my theory and showed it to my friend and he was like: "oh yea, sure its @(*&(!*%&(!*$ scale, really tough thing to learn" - you can guess what kind of smile I had on my face, and it was worth every second of practicing alone in the dark with no real help.

Though the downside in that is the fact that I really don't understand the definitions of people in music theory - hell I'm not even sure I got the right idea about what's a scale. But people looking from the outside think I'm some sort of music genius (even musicians).

I know you probably want a step-by-step guide on to how make your life easier with guitar learning but when I think about it - there's none. I can assure you though that a software called GuitarPro and the website Ultimate-Guitar.com will help you a lot in your journey, and if you have any more specific questions I'd be glad to help.

Also, if you think that you're playing like shit you should check the guitar tuning that needs to be in place in order to play a certain song - just a little tip that screwed me over thousands of times when I tried to play a song...

Good luck mate!
 

kantor1003

Prolific Member
Joined
Aug 13, 2009
Messages
1,573
Location
Norway
#4
Could you be more specific? What do you want to get out of the guitar? What music do you want to play? What music do you enjoy? Also, what about music theory doesn't make sense to you? Examples?
 

Trebuchet

Prolific Member
Joined
Aug 17, 2009
Messages
1,018
Location
California, USA
#5
I agree completely with LPolarite. I never played guitar but I took drum lessons for years and I think there is similarity in all instruments. The logic behind the music eventually comes clear. Not all at first, but in little bits, and with greater depth over time. The brain gets trained by hearing and playing the music, maybe even more than by learning the theory. At some point, you start thinking, "of course that part had to be in there" and then you can go look at the theory to find out why. If it is part of the theory you already learned, then it is more like "oh, so that's what they were talking about."

Boring patches happen, and plateaus, and songs you don't like, and other people being better, but just keep going. Eventually you get past each obstacle and find the fun again. I think music is a lovely challenge for an INTP, enabling a dimension of intellectual development you can't get any other way.

My dad is also INTP and plays piano very well, and he always says that he plays for himself, his own pleasure, and not for an audience. Drums are the same for me, really. Why do you play guitar? Whatever your reason, can focusing on that be enough to let you endure? Because I think both enduring and constantly taking a fresh look at the fun parts are needed.
 

pjoa09

dopaminergic
Joined
Feb 9, 2010
Messages
1,814
Location
th
#6
well i learnt a few chords... i never considered lessons as an option. my ass i am gonna bother go off my way and listen to someone else how to play something i bet anyone can learn by themselves with a little persistence.

so i learnt a few chords kept doing them and doing them and got pretty good at them. then i got playful and i enjoyed solos so i was just messing around with the second string at the high 10 20 frets.. and sometimes trying out other songs.. i am not like a band player or anything i just use it as an expression of emotion i guess. its extremely addictive i ended up sitting there playing all night till i fell asleep.
 

snafupants

Prolific Member
Joined
May 31, 2010
Messages
5,026
#7
The overwhelming majority of musicians, some quality ones too, cannot read sheet music at all. I am the quintessential fake musician: I can play something quite good and shamelessly rehearsed at a party, but when someone starts making requests, I suddenly have the need to get another drink or avail myself to the washroom.
 

Glordag

Pensive Poster
Joined
Oct 6, 2010
Messages
411
Location
Florida
#8
well i learnt a few chords... i never considered lessons as an option. my ass i am gonna bother go off my way and listen to someone else how to play something i bet anyone can learn by themselves with a little persistence.

so i learnt a few chords kept doing them and doing them and got pretty good at them. then i got playful and i enjoyed solos so i was just messing around with the second string at the high 10 20 frets.. and sometimes trying out other songs.. i am not like a band player or anything i just use it as an expression of emotion i guess. its extremely addictive i ended up sitting there playing all night till i fell asleep.
I'm finding lessons to be incredibly helpful, actually. For a long while (2ish years) I would randomly pick up my guitar, play a song or two I learned, noodle around, and put it down. I would do this every day for a few weeks, and then lose interest and put the guitar down for a couple of months before picking it back up.

I've since started taking lessons, and it is helping immensely. I'm naturally working into a good practice routine, learning how to actually make use of what I figured out from noodling around, correcting errors in my technique, learning a wealth of information that would have taken me much longer to pick up on my own, and really beginning to see how things come together.

So, to more directly answer your question - I made crap for progress on my own, but private lessons have helped immensely. If lessons aren't an option, I would suggest that you learn basic theory, spend a couple of weeks on each block (like 2 weeks on the pentatonic scales, 2 weeks on the majors, 2 weeks on forming chords, 2 weeks on basic chord progressions, etc.).

The trick is to slowly bring in new pieces, take your time but be dedicated and persistent, and relate each new piece to what you've learned previously. Don't forget to devote part of your practice time to having fun, or you'll get frustrated with the theory/exercises and quit :D.
 

shadowdrums4

wierd drummer kid
Joined
Jan 4, 2010
Messages
110
Location
Cumming, GA (I swear it's a real place)
#9
I took music theory with my percussion teacher at school. I loved it. Since I had already been playing percussion pretty well for 7 years, learning theory was just a "Oh wow so that's how it works" thing. It made me love music even more because everything just makes sense. There were so many rules, and when you know them, you know how to bend them to get what you are looking for. It became all about pushing the boundries. I still barely scratched the surface since a lot of the kids were kinda behind me. The percussion director worked theory into a lot of what we did, so I already knew some of it, but by the end of the year, there wasn't anyone in my percussion class who knew more than I did, even the kids who had taken theory the year before. I'd research it after school and stuff.

It is true a majority of famous musicians don't know how to read music, but having the ability opens so many more doors for you as a guitarist. (or drummer) After all someone makes the music you hear in every tv show/movie/commercial you see. Those people were called up and learned it in minutes. You can also play in things like broadway and orchestras or symphonies. So if it's something you'd like to make some cash with, theory and stuff is the way to go, or at least some understanding of sheet music.

Anyway to answer your question on progress, (for me it was drums and percussion) the first little bit is the hardest. I'd say find as many different kinds of workouts you can. (like warm ups and exercises) and work on them really slow and really fast. Metronomes are also a really good idea, but messing around is one of the best ways to learn what works and what doesn't. Like I said, I had been playing seven years before I knew the why behind anything.

Like Treb said, listening to music helps too. Once you know what your doing, when you hear a guitar part your brain starts figuring out how to do it on sound alone, before long, you can hear a song and play it after just a short time of trying to find the notes. Of course the key to getting good at any instrument is to keep playing it as much as possible. Also find a teacher that is interesting to you to learn from. I think part of why I love it so much is because the teacher I had was very cool. He was extremely laid back and to the point. It was like "Dude, check this out, isn't it wild? Look at the patterns the notes make" Like the circle of fifths, it blew my mind that the intervals worked the way they did. Then I was taught to build minors, and the 3 kinds, then blues. Then we sat back and learned technical names for time signatures and stuff, and different terms for moving notes, then all the modes of scales. We were scratching the surface of progressions when the school year ended. We also used a program called sybelius to write music, a program I hope to own soon. I'd recommend getting it or a program similar, then you can write things, hear how they sound, and learn to play them on your own.

I guess the biggest thing I noticed in my own playing was that I'd always hit a "speed wall" it was a level that I would just max out at and couldn't get any faster, but once I worked at it and got passed it, my ability skyrocketed over the next couple months. I don't know if that's normal (since no other kid said anything about it in class) but it helped me a lot. I'm currently hitting my 3rd speed wall. 16ths at 180 beats per minute. I'd hit that wall for other things too. There's be a place that I didn't think I could go any further with notes on the staff or being able to hear stuff (ear training) and even scales. I always worked on it, knowing there was a higher level to reach, and I suppose that's what kept me going. Just remember, the better you know the basics, the easier and more fun the more advanced stuff will be.

I'm on muscle relaxers right now so I may be rambling. My advice in short: play a lot, learn what you can, expose yourself to every kind of music, and get really good at the basics. Good luck!
 

MaxP

Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2010
Messages
28
Location
Calgary
#10
Music is about the only place I like to go logic-free. But serously, I never found lessons very helpful. I have my grade 7 piano certificate but haven't played in probably 4 years. I picked up the guitar about 3 years ago, played around with it for a bit but never really got going until about a year later. I took lessons but never practiced what my teacher told me to other than some scales cause I recognized to importance. The only stuff that I really found helpful was that he was able to help me with my playing technique, show me better ways of positioning my hand and that type of stuff. It was fun to play with him cause he was very good, but I think I'm happier just figuring it out for myself. I don't really care if I learn the "right" way, I'd kind of rather figure out my own methods.

Guitar has become my main outlet. It's a place where I don't have to tell my feelings to shut up because they'll just get me in a mess. I play electric, make noise, turn nob's on my pedal board, make new noise, turn on feedback loop, my weirder noises, play guitar for a bit, make noise... etc It's great fun!

Seriously though I really do recomend learning to play an instrument, especially to INTPs. Nothing can put my mind at ease quite like a good guitar session. Look up tab's for songs you like, you'll figure out the rest as you go. If get too frustrated then consider lesson's but I would just try to go at it alone first
 
Joined
Oct 27, 2010
Messages
204
Location
Israel
#11
Seems I found a pattern here in the answers of us, the musicians in the forum -

Learn by your own for a year until you find your first enlightenment and then try lessons to advance you further, if it doesn't, then stick to doodling around with the guitar for as long as you want and then maybe try again with the lessons?
Different teachers also helps.

As someone who hates lessons I can tell you that sometimes I feel that I regret the decision I made with the guitar, but thinking it through again - I'm mostly playing for fun! So why do I need lessons to do that? - Well, the answer is to gain more fun by knowing more and adding things together... But does learning that with a teacher really worths it for you? Do you care how other people perceive you as that kind of musician that doesn't really know shit?

I'll give you an example: 3 years ago I came to my buddy's birthday, apparently at that time all the kids he knew and invited (that weren't related to me in any way - that was the first time I saw them) only started playing the guitar. So I joined in, with the experience of 1 year I pawned their sorry asses. But then out of nowhere came another guy with a guitar, he played like a machine! Every song I knew - he did aswell, and more!
So then he asked me "Alright mate, let's play together. Go to G scale and I'll lead the way"
And everyone around us were excited, the two best guitarists around were gonna hook up together and then the disappointment came... "I don't really have an idea what G scale is", and the crowd looked at me funny. He answered with a smirk, said "Whatever" and continued playing alone.
I was offended and frustrated a bit ofcourse, but then I saw beyond that. I was doing it for fun, not for competition... Sure, it would've probably been great playing with that guy now that I have more knowledge - but it would feel a little bit superficial, as though I'm pleasing the crowd and not myself.

Atleast that is the way I think about it. Bottom line, it all depends on whether you'd like to do something with your own knowledge and have fun experimenting without really knowing where you're going with that or with the help of others and knowing every step of the way, one by one playing it for fun.

It reminds me a bit of my on-going struggle to learn advanced chess, should I? or should I stick to my own learning? Since chess involves interaction with other people I think I'm going to learn through people or even strategies online and books. This topic made it more clear for me (:

These thoughts are for your consideration.
 

Trebuchet

Prolific Member
Joined
Aug 17, 2009
Messages
1,018
Location
California, USA
#12
I'm currently hitting my 3rd speed wall. 16ths at 180 beats per minute. I'd hit that wall for other things too. There's be a place that I didn't think I could go any further with notes on the staff or being able to hear stuff (ear training) and even scales. I always worked on it, knowing there was a higher level to reach, and I suppose that's what kept me going. Just remember, the better you know the basics, the easier and more fun the more advanced stuff will be.
Impressive example of what you can do when you practice a lot. I think you are a more serious musician than I am and have gone rather farther than me. I hope you keep that up.
 

dark

Bring this savage back home.
Joined
Sep 19, 2010
Messages
902
#13
I am not INTP, but ENTP is close so I'll say my view; when first learning I learned every Black Sabbath song I could find the tabs to, then I went to Modest Mouse, then I kind of back tracked and went to Johnny Cash(I know, I know) then I started trying to learn the Rolling Stones, here is where I found myself. A mix of the Keith Richards and Issac Brock and I found who I was, not like either of them, but me. I think what I did was open myself to different types of playing, which allowed me to find who I was musically. I am completely against learning music theory, since I really don't have the attention span :D and it kind of kills the idea. Music is really an expression of the individual, I would think J types would be more inclined to study theory, maybe I don't know. But I did learn basic scales, and I have incorperated about 10 that I know of, don't know the names, but I can almost always find the scale any song is being played in, then I can slowly learn where the artist is playing, and pick songs out. Etc Etc.
 

Sensi Star

Active Member
Joined
Sep 16, 2010
Messages
201
Location
USA
#14
Well, I have tried learning on my own, and I was getting absolutely nowhere. I just couldn't figure out which note I should hit next, and it always ended up sounding atonal when I went with instinct. I recently took an intermediate guitar class, and got some scales to practice out of it, but I could never figure out what to do with the scales. It seems I cannot work with something unless I know the WHY behind it. And trying to learn the why of music is extremely difficult. I often jam to backing tracks, and sometimes get in good riffs, but I get bored easily noodling around with just one scales.

Here's a few things that puzzle me about guitar theory...

How do you know what scales to play, and in what key in order to sound good with a certain backing track?

How do you know when to change keys based on the keys and chord changes in a backing track?

What do the scales of G major, G minor, G major pentatonic, and G minor pentatonic all have in common? What are the key parts that differentiate them? How do you know which of these to use in a particular context?

My guitar teacher gave me a sheet with the CAGED Major scales. The root note is marked in each "form" of scale, so you can select the key by aligning the root note with the note you want to be the key. How do you know which form to use when playing in a certain key?
 

Glordag

Pensive Poster
Joined
Oct 6, 2010
Messages
411
Location
Florida
#15
Well, I have tried learning on my own, and I was getting absolutely nowhere. I just couldn't figure out which note I should hit next, and it always ended up sounding atonal when I went with instinct. I recently took an intermediate guitar class, and got some scales to practice out of it, but I could never figure out what to do with the scales. It seems I cannot work with something unless I know the WHY behind it. And trying to learn the why of music is extremely difficult. I often jam to backing tracks, and sometimes get in good riffs, but I get bored easily noodling around with just one scales.

Here's a few things that puzzle me about guitar theory...

How do you know what scales to play, and in what key in order to sound good with a certain backing track?

The scale to play depends on the "mood" you want to achieve. Knowing which to play is largely a matter of learning scale modes and how they relate to each other.

How do you know when to change keys based on the keys and chord changes in a backing track?

Somewhat a matter of taste. You generally want to stay in the same key as the backing track you're playing to, so you wouldn't change keys unless the track did. You could change scale modes if you're soloing or something, though. Again, this goes back to the "mood" you are trying to achieve.

What do the scales of G major, G minor, G major pentatonic, and G minor pentatonic all have in common? What are the key parts that differentiate them? How do you know which of these to use in a particular context?

They all have the same tonic (root) note. The pentatonic scales are just 5 note scales of their 7 note counterparts, so essentially you remove two (specific, not arbitrary) of the notes. The major and minor scales of the same root note are parallel scales - you won't generally use them together. If you're playing in a G major key, and are playing the G major scale, you'd often want to play the relative minor scale over the same key, instead (E minor in this case). The get the relative minor by taking the 6th note of the major scale you are in (GABCDEF# is G major, so you see that E is the 6th note there, which is why E minor is the relative minor to G major).

My guitar teacher gave me a sheet with the CAGED Major scales. The root note is marked in each "form" of scale, so you can select the key by aligning the root note with the note you want to be the key. How do you know which form to use when playing in a certain key?

Not really sure if I understand the question, but figuring out which scale to play in a certain key is just a matter of the sound you are trying to achieve. Major scales are usually happy (though this can vary based on how you play it), minor scales are sad, etc.
Hopefully I'm not sending you off track. I'm still sort of at the beginning of this stuff myself, but I believe I was accurate in my responses.
 

shadowdrums4

wierd drummer kid
Joined
Jan 4, 2010
Messages
110
Location
Cumming, GA (I swear it's a real place)
#16
Impressive example of what you can do when you practice a lot. I think you are a more serious musician than I am and have gone rather farther than me. I hope you keep that up.
hehe thanks. I should probably mention that the first 3 years (middle school) My teachers weren't the best at teaching technique in percussion. I came into freshman year unable to pass 80 beats a minute (first wall) and I took my first lesson with a drumline helper (who didn't teach at the school) and he fixed my technique and gave me some basic workouts, after a couple weeks I jumped up to 120, the second wall was hit at 160. It was broken because the second half of freshman year (Indoor season) the pit captain had us work on nothing but chops for the first hour of the 3 hour rehearsals. By the end of that year I had gotten to about 152, I was told by my director that to play bass drum (since I'm so small it'd have to be the top 2) that I'd need at least 160 comfortably. I didn't get it by the audition (which was at the end of the school year) but over the summer and over the next couple years, I slowly improved to 175. I'm currently working to get into college as a percussion major. I don't really care what I end up doing, I just want to be playing. The teacher became one of my best friends, and I think I was one of his favorite students because not only did I work hard like that, even though I wasn't in any kind of leadership or "band help" position, I was constantly helping those people out. I'd help the captain with maintenance, never leaving a practice without asking if they needed any help. I'd say music is one of the only things that energizes me and keeps my interest year after year because there's always so much more to learn, always a higher level.

This post is kinda off topic though so I'll stop now. :)
 

Oblivious

Is Kredit to Team!!
Joined
Apr 30, 2008
Messages
1,270
Location
Purgatory with the cool kids
#17
Interesting thread.

Been mucking around on the guitar for about a year myself. So how do you guys practise? Do you just jam or is there a specific method you stick to?
 

Glordag

Pensive Poster
Joined
Oct 6, 2010
Messages
411
Location
Florida
#18
Interesting thread.

Been mucking around on the guitar for about a year myself. So how do you guys practise? Do you just jam or is there a specific method you stick to?
In the past when I didn't make much progress, I mostly just learned a new song here or there, practiced songs I had already learned, and then mucked around with random things trying to make them sound alright. This method did not result in a lot of progress for me, other than the initial stage of learning to play open chords and such. This also kept me from being motivated.

More recently, I will practice what my guitar teacher gives me (which is mostly scales, improvising, and a couple of techniques right now), study a little bit of theory and try and relate it to the guitar, and then mess around like I used to. It's going quite well, and I actually feel like everything is coming together for once. I'm very motivated at the moment (: .
 

kantor1003

Prolific Member
Joined
Aug 13, 2009
Messages
1,573
Location
Norway
#19
If you're playing in a G major key, and are playing the G major scale, you'd often want to play the relative minor scale over the same key, instead (E minor in this case). The get the relative minor by taking the 6th note of the major scale you are in (GABCDEF# is G major, so you see that E is the 6th note there, which is why E minor is the relative minor to G major).
What do you mean? If you are playing in a G major key, (you haven't specified a chord btw, so I'll just assume Gmaj7 for the sake of making a point) it doesn't matter if you play an E aeolian or a G ionian. It will sound the same. Over a Gmaj7 the only sound you'll going to achieve by using tonal material derived from the key of G major is a G ionian sound.

I think op had some questions about how to know which scale to use over what chords etc.. it's a broad subject. Perhaps checking out my theory thread will help. http://intpforum.com/showthread.php?t=6591

Some ultra concise information.
Over major chords, depending on tonal context (which require some more information I haven't the time to explain now), you want to be playing major scales. You have 3 to choose from using modes from the major scale (I wont cover the modes found within melodic and harmonic minor, or more obscure scales); the major/ionian scale, the lydian scale and the mixolydian scale.
Over minor chords you want to be playing minor scales. Using the modes found within the major scale you have 3 to choose from. Regular minor/aeolian, dorian and phrygian.
The one you choose depends on the chords function in that specific harmonic context.
If it is a single chord, or modal vamp you are free to choose however you'd like. Starting out, I would just practice playing over single chord vamps and experiment with the different modes to get a feel for how they sound.

An easy way to get a feel for how the different modes sound is just play an open E, letting it ring, and improvise using the scale you want to check out.. for example E phrygian or E lydian.
 

Glordag

Pensive Poster
Joined
Oct 6, 2010
Messages
411
Location
Florida
#20
An easy way to get a feel for how the different modes sound is just play an open E, letting it ring, and improvise using the scale you want to check out.. for example E phrygian or E lydian.
Interesting...I'll have to try this. Also, thanks for the correction/clarification on what I said. I read back over what I wrote, and it was pretty vague and not very insightful :P.
 

snafupants

Prolific Member
Joined
May 31, 2010
Messages
5,026
#21
Ermine is pretty impressive with the old six string, saw her on youtube playing Led Zeppelin and other catchy riff bands.
 
Joined
Nov 12, 2010
Messages
9
#22
Interesting thread, finally I am gaining some serious ground after switching to practicing bass covers for a year, previous years were trying to learn guitar while writing my own music, no covers. I thought I had no natural talent, kind of hopeless it seemed. I found a system that is working for me. It does not involve learning where notes are or boring ass scales. I will elaborate when I am less tired and not drinking.
 

Ermine

is watching and taking notes
Joined
Dec 24, 2007
Messages
2,878
Location
casually playing guitar in my mental arena
#23
I've been trying to learn guitar for quite a while now. I memorized some limited scales and my speed/technique is fairly decent. However, I just cannot grasp music theory / the formula of music. I think it's because of my over-analytical INTP logic.
Most teaching methods deal with one piece of information at a time--and rely on the student having faith that it will make sense eventually--but my logical mind demands to know how each fits into the larger picture and how it is a fragment of a consistent underlying pattern. I then end up being overwhelmed by this quest to identify the logic behind music, because there is so much variety within music; and there seem to be inconsistencies and concepts that don't make sense, leaving me "down the rabbit hole" trying to understand it all.

I'm wondering if there are any INTPs here that are progressing smoothly with learning guitar. I would like a reference to how they got on the right track, and which types of training (preferably available online) work best for the INTP mind. Any insight appreciated.
...yeah. I know a thing or two about music theory and I still have issues applying it to guitar beyond basic chords and scales. I think music theory is much straightforward in terms of piano. The whole chromatic scale is right there in front of you and it's much easier to connect the notes to what you're reading. So if you really want to learn music theory, my suggestion would be to familiarize yourself with the keyboard. And music theory makes much more sense when you remember that many music rules are made to be broken. For example, medieval choral music has lots of perfect fifths in it. By the time the baroque period came along, perfect fifths were considered "illegal". Same goes for many other music theory principles. Also keep in mind that music theory can be really complex (the extent of my knowledge is baroque music theory, and it only gets more complex from there). It may seem illogical, but there's always a method to the madness. So learn the rules, so you can break them, create your own, or choose which ones you prefer. Have fun in the rabbit hole. We're having a caucus race! :)

Ermine is pretty impressive with the old six string, saw her on youtube playing Led Zeppelin and other catchy riff bands.
Really? It's still killing me how much I butchered those songs... And it's killing me even more that I don't have time to practice on a regular basis.
 

Glordag

Pensive Poster
Joined
Oct 6, 2010
Messages
411
Location
Florida
#26
You're going to make me work to find it. *groan*

Fine! But you get negative INTP karma points :p.

Lucky for you, karma doesn't really work in my favor.

Edit: Hey, that was pretty nifty. Loving the song selection. I've noticed a lot of INTP/INTJ types seem to be into prog metal/prog rock/metal without necessarily wanting to look the part (black wardrobe, hard around the edges, etc.), myself included. Pretty interesting.
 
Joined
Nov 14, 2010
Messages
3
#27
Lessons suck. Books suck. I learn a lot from youtube. Find a good song. Learn it. Learn the unique techniques in each song. Add it to your ammo. Keep your gun loaded.
 
Joined
Sep 10, 2010
Messages
33
#29
I tried to learn to play guitar, but it didn't really work out too well. I always got into it, and then I ended up not having time and not getting into playing much. In lessons, I never really grasped it.
 

phial

Redshirt
Joined
Nov 21, 2010
Messages
22
#30
I've been playing guitar for .. well, 10 years in total, not counting the breaks I took.

I don't know sheet music, and the only scales are basic ones I learned from Guitar-World like the blues box scale.

Everything I picked up was self taught by ear. Its something that has to be felt out. I think it worked out for the best, there are things I got out of it that couldn't come from a book. Like actually feeling the interference pattern between two notes and realizing the relation to quantum physics. Its like riding a bike, once you get it you see it everywhere.
 
Joined
Mar 11, 2016
Messages
867
Location
Just North of Normal
#31
Raising the dead

I'm just grumpy that I can't jam along w Queen songs yet
Urgh
 
Joined
Jan 24, 2013
Messages
6,452
Location
A hut in the woods
#32
I am actually pretty good at just picking up my guitar and playing some shit that sounds good. I just am musically talented I guess. My problem is that I don't practice enough. I am still a novice but I still can play shit that sounds decent.

I play my guitar very rarely. I often come up with some pretty decent licks, but this is mostly due to having experience playing bass in HS so they often come out more like basslines than actual guitar licks... They still sound cool, they just sound like bass licks *shrug*

I remember when I was able to learn the DOOM theme song by ear.. That was a good day.
 
Top Bottom