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BigApplePi
18th-August-2013, 05:26 PM
From time-to-time there has been quite a valuable discussion of Nutrition Health Longevity on the Ask Architect (http://www.intpforum.com/showthread.php?p=344350#post344350) thread. Unfortunately these issues have just popped up and grew before anyone created a separate thread for them. In my opinion it's too late to make separate threads and would be awkward if tried.

I offer as a solution to go to Ask Architect (http://www.intpforum.com/showthread.php?p=344350#post344350) and do a "Search this Thread (http://www.intpforum.com/showthread.php?p=385018&nojs=1#goto_threadsearch)" using relevant words to your interest such as:
diet
vitamin
nutrition
protein

Feel free to add words of interest to this thread ... or create a table of contents to the AA thread.

just george
18th-August-2013, 05:38 PM
One of my friends fathers, who lived on the Greek Islands, was studied by some European body on longevity. I'll pass on what he said in regards to this issue.

Anyway, as a bit of background, he lived is a place where medical aid isn't exactly of western standards - isolated island, not enough money to buy drugs etc. Water came out of the well, food was grown locally etc. and he made it until 101 years of age. He was actively working as a carpenter until 85 years old or so.

He smoked a lot. A LOT. ie he would buy 2 packs of 200 cigarettes every 3 days, which works out to 133 smokes a day, or about 6 and a half packs a day. He used to drink a lot too.

Anyway, he stopped smoking at about 50-60 years old, and changed his ways.

His diet consisted mostly of legumes (chick peas, peas and the like cooked with olive oil), with fish 2 times a week, and meat once or so a week. He said to stop eating one mouthful before you were full. At the end of the evening, he would drink one small glass of port or local white wine.

He told the doctors etc who studied him that the main thing keeping him alive was the mediterranean diet coupled with not eating until being absolutely satisfied, plus working as much as was reasonable for your age. He walked about 3km each way to his workshop each day.

He ended up having an accidental fall, and caught pneumonia in hospital, which was what got him in the end. Otherwise, he'd probably still be alive.

Just thought I'd share that, cos I think the overeating aspect of nutrition is important.

BigApplePi
18th-August-2013, 06:09 PM
He may have been lucky as to contagious diseases and taking a chance with all that smoking. Consider this logic: The body is used, exercised, processes input and output and makes replacements. All that wears out slowly until something breaks and one goes under the threshold to maintain life. The more there is to replace, the greater the chance something will go wrong.

I have approximately an extra two inches on my waistline. So what? Here is what: That extra fat has to be processed. If there is fat around my waistline that suggests extra fat around my internal organs as well. That ain't gonna help any. Five percent of organic junk on my body over time will accumulate the risk of something failing greatly. Your Greek man apparently did things optimally for his body except for what was mentioned.

just george
18th-August-2013, 06:41 PM
It's a bit more complicated than just having some extra fat that needs "processing". Any extra tissue and available nutrients etc affect an entire cascade of processes in the human body that are suboptimal. For example, having extra fat on you and then eating a perfect diet will affect how you metabolize that perfect food, throwing the whole thing out of kilter, since the availability of those spare fat molecules for ketone production will alter what your body will do with nutrients that it is getting on a day to day basis.

Those metabolic effects then impact the entire body, affecting what kinds of nutrients your organs will consume, what kinds of waste will be produced, the overall acidity/alkalinity of your blood or extracellular fluids etc.

But anyway, the point I was trying to make was not just food quality, but food volume. Study after study has been done on rats and other animals that show that reducing food intake at certain times in life, particularly in old age, can increase lifespan considerably. It is possible to have too much of a good thing - which I think is very much overlooked, particularly in the West.

Beat Mango
19th-August-2013, 12:24 AM
Longevity (quantity of life) is a weak ideal, I think. I'm interested in diets that will improve quality of life, tho I'm guessing what's good for one is good for the other.

Architect
19th-August-2013, 02:44 AM
Longevity (quantity of life) is a weak ideal, I think. I'm interested in diets that will improve quality of life, tho I'm guessing what's good for one is good for the other.

Yes, the two go hand in hand.

There are some key points we know about healthy diets. One is that it's important to not eat a diet that increases inflammation. For example, the endothiel cell lining of your vessels becomes inflamed when you eat oil. Fat is important in our diet, but people then take that to mean that eating olive oil is healthy. Inflammation decreases longevity and reduces the present quality of life by compromising the immune system. That is, it becomes too busy fighting inflammation and is less able to serve its main purpose.

Two is that it's important to even out the insulin response. Refined foods hype this, while whole foods do not.

Three, regardless of whether you believe meat is healthy or not, it's conclusive that most of your diet should be comprised of colorful vegetables. No primate on this planet, including mankind, evolved to eat the quantities of refined and meat based foods that modern humans eat.

BigApplePi
19th-August-2013, 02:59 AM
No primate on this planet, including mankind, evolved to eat the quantities of refined and meat based foods that modern humans eat.When man first evolved I don't know what to make of what he ate. He didn't evolve to live long, did he? Wasn't the average life span in the twenties? Even if it went to the thirties, was there time to settle on a diet that mattered? Why do I have the feeling there are missing steps to this process? I guess I'm forgetting animal experiments.

Architect
19th-August-2013, 03:23 AM
When man first evolved I don't know what to make of what he ate. He didn't evolve to live long, did he? Wasn't the average life span in the twenties? Even if it went to the thirties, was there time to settle on a diet that mattered? Why do I have the feeling there are missing steps to this process? I guess I'm forgetting animal experiments.

Animals have systems that evolved for the food they ate. Lions, as carnivores, have very short digestive tracts which produce enormous amounts of hydrochloric acid to disinfect and dissolve chunks of meat. Humans have very long digestive tracts, good for extracting calories from nutrient dense low calorie plants. Cows have multiple stomachs, good for extracting calories and nutrients through a process of fermentation from grass. And so forth ... people who know more about this than I have compared humans/primates and found that our systems evolved for nutrient dense foods, not a omnivores' diet (such as Bears), nor a carnivores. Doesn't it seem logical that putting diesel into a regular gasoline tank would stress the engine?