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What are the negatives and positives of identifying as INTP?

Ink

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Is thinking of yourself as different from other people something everyone does in differing ways?
 

Absurdity

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In my experience, the initial benefits of discovering one's INTP-ness come from acquiring a more holistic understanding of one's thought processes and habits that others may find eccentric or just plain weird. It's very eery how well the detailed descriptions can fit. There is also a lot to be gained in understanding one's own strengths and weaknesses, so that one may strive towards a career or lifestyle that plays to their respective strengths instead of conforming to the societal ideal(s) (2.4 kids, white picket fence, 9-5 desk job, church on Sundays), which may be ill-fitting and psychically draining.

Obviously study of the MBTI has other benefits, such as (*gasp*) learning that other people have different thought processes that you do! Might explain why they're all so frustratingly illogical all the time. :rolleyes:

Beyond that, one risks attempting to conform to the mold, as they see the INTP archetype as some sort of ideal to emulate. They might think to themselves, "It says here most INTPs find satisfaction in the sciences and mathematics. That's funny, I've never cared for them." From there they might try to force themselves into something they are neither good at nor truly care for, or might sink into an anxious depression where they doubt the validity of their MBTI test results or self-assessment.

Personally, taking the MBTI and discovering that I was an INTP was the beginning of something. It made me more introspective and curious about what sort of person I am, where my talents lie, and what I may one day wish to become. I don't need to identify as an INTP or weigh my life choices against the mold because it has become too limiting for me. One INTPc member, tongue wedged firmly in cheek, subdivided the INTP into 24 subtypes, and I think this perfectly displays the limits of any sort of armchair generalization about human behavior.
 

Fukyo

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Negatives?

Trying to consciously fit into the preconceived notion of the type, experiencing cognitive dissonance when perceiving yourself to act or think "un-INTP like"

Justifying your shortcomings and flaws as being normal due to your type.

Thinking you are or have the potential to be special and outstanding due to your type.

Instead of accepting different ways of cognition in others, stereotyping people through crude generalizations and thus ironically failing to understand them. Though this is more related to assuming MBTI into your worldview.
 

Chad

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In my experience, the initial benefits of discovering one's INTP-ness come from acquiring a more holistic understanding of one's thought processes and habits that others may find eccentric or just plain weird. It's very eery how well the detailed descriptions can fit. There is also a lot to be gained in understanding one's own strengths and weaknesses, so that one may strive towards a career or lifestyle that plays to their respective strengths instead of conforming to the societal ideal(s) (2.4 kids, white picket fence, 9-5 desk job, church on Sundays), which may be ill-fitting and psychically draining.

Obviously study of the MBTI has other benefits, such as (*gasp*) learning that other people have different thought processes that you do! Might explain why they're all so frustratingly illogical all the time. :rolleyes:

Beyond that, one risks attempting to conform to the mold, as they see the INTP archetype as some sort of ideal to emulate. They might think to themselves, "It says here most INTPs find satisfaction in the sciences and mathematics. That's funny, I've never cared for them." From there they might try to force themselves into something they are neither good at nor truly care for, or might sink into an anxious depression where they doubt the validity of their MBTI test results or self-assessment.

Personally, taking the MBTI and discovering that I was an INTP was the beginning of something. It made me more introspective and curious about what sort of person I am, where my talents lie, and what I may one day wish to become. I don't need to identify as an INTP or weigh my life choices against the mold because it has become too limiting for me. One INTPc member, tongue wedged firmly in cheek, subdivided the INTP into 24 subtypes, and I think this perfectly displays the limits of any sort of armchair generalization about human behavior.
PNIT-"the context jumper"
The other PN, tends towards comparing seemingly incompatible systems. They thrive on ideas like quines and seemingly inappropriate metaphors.

PNTI-"the qc"
This type uses a wild intellectual instinct to perfect systems, whether they were the originator or not. The weak TI creates ambivalence towards identity and logic.

When I took his test my I and T were the same. Normally my T is higher then I and sometimes higher then N. P is always my highest score.

The score in my signature has my P and N equal. So if I would have to pick one average type I would say the PNTI is most likely. However, the PNIT actually fit me characteristic wise. I love comparing seemingly Incompatible systems. Theology and Science combination is one of my favorite studies.

Anyway back to the OP. I would have to agree with Absurdity. MBTI is good for helping you understand how you thought process might work. Its also a great tool for introspection.

The problem is when someone believe that they need to conform to all the stereotypes in that given MBTI results.

So basically it good to use your results to help you understand yourself better but it not a type that you want to fake or your will not be happy with yourself. MBTI are not rules to live by they are guideline to understanding personality quirks better.
 

Ink

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PNTI-"the qc"
This type uses a wild intellectual instinct to perfect systems, whether they were the originator or not. The weak TI creates ambivalence towards identity and logic.

NPTI-"the mediator"
With a kind, agreeable nature, this subtype wants to classify and sort much like the NPIT, but tries to do this from within whichever system is dominant.


Didn't take the test too seriously, funny though
 

Architect

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The benefit of knowing what your type is - any type - is that you can maximize your strengths and minimize your weaknesses. A common meme from a few years ago is that you should be well rounded. Stupid idea ... I spent years working on being well rounded and it didn't get me anywhere other than away from myself.

People definitely don't want to be lopsided, but a little well-roundedness goes a long way.
 

Hadoblado

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Absurdity and Fukyo's posts are rather spot on.

@Architect
While I agree that one shouldn't try to be someone they're not in order to meet some criteria of 'roundedness', I think a lot of people don't realise that they even have certain capacities, and so neglect them completely to their own detriment. I have zero interest in rounding Ni, Si, Se, or Fi, but I have found that developing my Fe has improved my quality of life considerably, when before I rejected the notion of social needs entirely.
 

QuickTwist

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In my experience, the initial benefits of discovering one's INTP-ness come from acquiring a more holistic understanding of one's thought processes and habits that others may find eccentric or just plain weird. It's very eery how well the detailed descriptions can fit. There is also a lot to be gained in understanding one's own strengths and weaknesses, so that one may strive towards a career or lifestyle that plays to their respective strengths instead of conforming to the societal ideal(s) (2.4 kids, white picket fence, 9-5 desk job, church on Sundays), which may be ill-fitting and psychically draining.

Obviously study of the MBTI has other benefits, such as (*gasp*) learning that other people have different thought processes that you do! Might explain why they're all so frustratingly illogical all the time. :rolleyes:

Beyond that, one risks attempting to conform to the mold, as they see the INTP archetype as some sort of ideal to emulate. They might think to themselves, "It says here most INTPs find satisfaction in the sciences and mathematics. That's funny, I've never cared for them." From there they might try to force themselves into something they are neither good at nor truly care for, or might sink into an anxious depression where they doubt the validity of their MBTI test results or self-assessment.

Personally, taking the MBTI and discovering that I was an INTP was the beginning of something. It made me more introspective and curious about what sort of person I am, where my talents lie, and what I may one day wish to become. I don't need to identify as an INTP or weigh my life choices against the mold because it has become too limiting for me. One INTPc member, tongue wedged firmly in cheek, subdivided the INTP into 24 subtypes, and I think this perfectly displays the limits of any sort of armchair generalization about human behavior.
IMO, This post is one of the best I have ever read in finding out who I am and it has a test to boot.:)

TPIN-"the stress test"
This type is the pure analyst who succeeds in dispassionately running simulations in their mind. These are the best visualizers out of all the 384 subtypes.


The benefit of knowing what your type is - any type - is that you can maximize your strengths and minimize your weaknesses. A common meme from a few years ago is that you should be well rounded. Stupid idea ... I spent years working on being well rounded and it didn't get me anywhere other than away from myself.

People definitely don't want to be lopsided, but a little well-roundedness goes a long way.
A very good post as well.
 

Architect

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@Architect
While I agree that one shouldn't try to be someone they're not in order to meet some criteria of 'roundedness', I think a lot of people don't realise that they even have certain capacities, and so neglect them completely to their own detriment. I have zero interest in rounding Ni, Si, Se, or Fi, but I have found that developing my Fe has improved my quality of life considerably, when before I rejected the notion of social needs entirely.
I think that's what I said, more or less :)
 

HDINTP

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TPIN – "stress test" – This subtype is the pure analyst who succeeds in dispassionately running simulations in their mind. These are potentially the best visualizers out of all the 384 subtypes.

Benefits:

Helped me to find answers on lot of questions I had on myself.

Negatives:

Found myself arrogant from time to time

Now it is 1:1 so I do not feel like thinking about next
 

Hadoblado

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The benefit of knowing what your type is - any type - is that you can maximize your strengths and minimize your weaknesses. A common meme from a few years ago is that you should be well rounded. Stupid idea ... I spent years working on being well rounded and it didn't get me anywhere other than away from myself.

People definitely don't want to be lopsided, but a little well-roundedness goes a long way.
My apologies, I completely missed the last sentence. I took the post as a flat rejection of rounding functions. Oops!
 

scorpiomover

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Is thinking of yourself as different from other people something everyone does in differing ways?
Yes. Everyone seems to feel that they are different from other people. We're in a culture that seems to breed alienation in people.

What are the negatives and positives of identifying as INTP?
The positives are that those attributes that one already had, which are so innate or reinforced in one, that they cannot be changed, and which are not inherently negative, but which are invalidated by society, and which INTPs often try to change without success, are revealed to be part of one's nature, and that it's perfectly okay to have those traits, and that they can even be useful. In that way, it's like being good at maths, in a school where nearly everyone else is bad at it. You still feel like there is something wrong with you. You spend ages trying to understand illogical perspectives, and spend ages wondering how one could possibly reject ideas that everyone else accepts so easily. You think there is something wrong with you. Then when you find out that you just have a brain that understands maths, and that it is so rare in your area, that it's considered incredibly useful to have such a brain.

Likewise, when you find out that all your weird stuff is because you're an INTP, then you just accept it, and stop worrying about it. You accept yourself. Moreover, you come across other INTPs, who have learned to use those skills to their benefit, which then leads you to realise that your INTP-based skills are useful as well. A lot less negative self-perceptions, and many new positive self-perceptions.

Also, that the inconsistencies in your thinking and your behaviour, suddenly become incredibly consistent, in terms of being an INTP. You suddenly feel like you make sense.

The negatives are when you believe that INTP defines you, and you let it limit you, or you try to make yourself fit into other people's images of an INTP. Like we saying that I can't be an INTP, because most INTPs are tidy. Or me even trying to mess up my room, simply because most INTPs on this site seem to say they just leave things anywhere in their room. It's really no different than what the person was doing before, when he didn't know that he was an INTP.
 

Architect

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My apologies, I completely missed the last sentence. I took the post as a flat rejection of rounding functions. Oops!
No problem, we're in violent agreement. You said it better than me.
 

Chad

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Yes. Everyone seems to feel that they are different from other people. We're in a culture that seems to breed alienation in people.

The positives are that those attributes that one already had, which are so innate or reinforced in one, that they cannot be changed, and which are not inherently negative, but which are invalidated by society, and which INTPs often try to change without success, are revealed to be part of one's nature, and that it's perfectly okay to have those traits, and that they can even be useful. In that way, it's like being good at maths, in a school where nearly everyone else is bad at it. You still feel like there is something wrong with you. You spend ages trying to understand illogical perspectives, and spend ages wondering how one could possibly reject ideas that everyone else accepts so easily. You think there is something wrong with you. Then when you find out that you just have a brain that understands maths, and that it is so rare in your area, that it's considered incredibly useful to have such a brain.

Likewise, when you find out that all your weird stuff is because you're an INTP, then you just accept it, and stop worrying about it. You accept yourself. Moreover, you come across other INTPs, who have learned to use those skills to their benefit, which then leads you to realise that your INTP-based skills are useful as well. A lot less negative self-perceptions, and many new positive self-perceptions.

Also, that the inconsistencies in your thinking and your behaviour, suddenly become incredibly consistent, in terms of being an INTP. You suddenly feel like you make sense.

The negatives are when you believe that INTP defines you, and you let it limit you, or you try to make yourself fit into other people's images of an INTP. Like we saying that I can't be an INTP, because most INTPs are tidy. Or me even trying to mess up my room, simply because most INTPs on this site seem to say they just leave things anywhere in their room. It's really no different than what the person was doing before, when he didn't know that he was an INTP.
I would like to meet this INTP. Tidiness is probably my largest problem in my marriage and I would love to get some advice how I could manage a tidy life. However, I do think its beyond INTPs that have an interests for passion in cleanliness to be ultra tidy. But like most thinks when it comes to INTPs it really not that INTPs are one thing or the other its that they are for the most part what they are passionate about. For many INTPs like myself this may be many things and life may be very chaotic purely due to my eccentric collections of interests. However, some other INTPs may only be interested in one or two things and they would be awesome of these things.

I think the thing that is most common among all INTPs is we are all bad a most things. Or not great at least. We have a very hard time staying motivated to achieve goals that don't interest us. Even though I have yet to meat on INTP on these forms that have nearly as many interests as I have (which I am sad about). I still have more week points of low motivations then passions that I am adequately good at.

This is to say that MBTI is a good too if you are looking at it what is meant to show. If you are an INTP you are a person driven by your interests and you have a hard time dealing with things outside the world constructed to support your interest. The level this exist is different for every INTP but it is the core that makes up INTPness.

I personally am an extreme I am quite good at what I am passionate about (sorry for the ego trip but it is true). However, I have many sort comings and most of them are hard to over look even for my fellow INTPs. Many INTPs on this forum seem to be average at most things with a few incites about certain things.

All of us are INTPs (besides the people that are not) its just the level at which we exert are INTP traits that are different.

I would say one of the negative parts (for me personally) about learning that I was INTP was that I assumed I would find people who shared my eccentrics personalty quarks. However, after starting to forum I realized that INTPs don't necessarily fit my quarks. We all seem to have quarks but not normally the same one. Joining INTP forums I didn't find a bunch of Chad clones that thought the same way I thought and this was very frustrating at first. I like being original and different but after reading the description of an INTP I allowed myself to believe that there were other people exactly like me.

To be honest I have more in common with my ISTJ wife then most of the INTPs I have found on this site and others. It's not because I am an ISTJ but because me and my wife like the same thing we have similar taste. Even if we arived at these tastes in nearly the opposite ways.

MBTI is good at answer one question about the person I am. It tells me who I prefer to reach conclusions. It's like other have said scary accurate in it's ability to identify my weaknesses and strengths when it comes to cognitive ability and talent. It shows what feels natural to me. However, there is much more to ones personality then there natural tendencies. Some examples are Tastes, Location, Culture, Values, Family, Relationships, Accessibilities, Faith, Accountabilities, Responsibilities and many other things that MBTI can not calculate and wasn't meant to calculate.
 

scorpiomover

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I would like to meet this INTP.
Typo. I meant "most INTPs are messy".

Tidiness is probably my largest problem in my marriage and I would love to get some advice how I could manage a tidy life.
I read books on it, and experimented with it. I grew up in a large family for the number of rooms we had. When I went to college, I was still sharing a room. Didn't actually have my own room till I was 23, and even then it was little more than a box room. Space is very expensive here, and at the same time, I like to buy books. So I try to squeeze the most stuff into the smallest spaces. Then I often want something, but can't find it. So then I have to be very inventive, about how to make things organised to maximise space usage, but at the same time, maximise accessibility.

I found that the key to tidyness, is doing a bit of tidying every single day. Clutter just builds up naturally, from the mail that arrives, to new stuff that you bought, to all the old stuff that you took out, and is now all over the place. So even if you get the place tidy, it will get messy before too long, unless you make it a part of your day, to every day, clear up some things.

Things I found useful for organising stuff:

(a) Make a place for everything, and when you've finished with it, put it back right away, or ASAP. If you can't do it now, make a point of doing so when you get home. A long time ago, I read that Red Adair built the first and most successful oil-fire-fighting company in history, using this one simple principle. He knew exactly where his tools were, So when others balked at putting out oil fires, he could go in and do what was needed, because he didn't waste a single second looking for his wrenches and other tools.

(b) Put things close to where you'll use them. All the kitchen stuff goes in the kitchen. Makes it much easier to find, and much quicker to do things.

(c) Make a list of everything that you have, where it is, when it was borrowed, who you lent it to, when you got it back, etc, like warehouses do. Then you know where things are, and they don't get lost when you need them.
 
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