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The Act of Killing

some.body

Having fun with Shakti in the Smashan
Local time
Today, 14:09
Joined
May 24, 2013
Messages
64
#1
I just watched this last night. I'm still trying to compartmentalize this, so I do not have a fluid opinion on it yet, but I figured that it would appeal to people on this forum.

Check out the trailer (the great Werner Herzog had his hand on this) and if it appeals to you I strongly suggest checking out the full documentary.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SD5oMxbMcHM


As an aside; do you gals/guys tend to watch movies at night as a kind of meditation or a way to relax?
 
Local time
Today, 18:09
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Dec 24, 2012
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Far away from All This
#2
Looks interesting, if not necessarily good. It's going to get a lot of press, both good and bad. Thanks for sharing.

SW
 

some.body

Having fun with Shakti in the Smashan
Local time
Today, 14:09
Joined
May 24, 2013
Messages
64
#3
Looks interesting, if not necessarily good. It's going to get a lot of press, both good and bad. Thanks for sharing.

SW
Agreed. And no problem. I'd love to get some other's opinions on this too. Cheers!
 

kantor1003

Prolific Member
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Today, 18:09
Joined
Aug 13, 2009
Messages
1,576
Location
Norway
#4
This is a spoiler, don't read if you haven't seen it.

(I'm no good with words today, but here are some of my thoughts) The scene were Anwar is strangled, to see the psychological impact unfold in the moment as he suddenly feels the brutal reality of his victims on himself, is one of the most powerful moments I've ever seen captured on film. It's so damningly clever; to give people like him the idea of doing a film on themselves. To bear witness to the resulting transformation - from his earlier distance of doing the whole hollywood thing, being an actor, to gradually move towards understanding. Once he is interrogated, the wire around his neck, it is no longer cinema. Being in the position he is, with his background, there is, in that moment, no difference between reality and roleplay. He got to experience being a victim and how hopeless a situation it is; that in such a situation there is no possible way, no matter how noble any attempted presentation, to prove ones humanity. After such an experience he can no longer find any justification for a division between himself and those he killed. As he later said, in that scene, he lost his dignity, and with that came, I think, the resulting realization that so does everyone else being interrogated in such a manner. He then uses cinema as an attempt of salvation: standing in front of a waterfall, one of his executed victims thanking him for sending him to heaven, for giving him an early exit from a cruel world.

This film is a masterpiece. Not only is it a fascinating exploration of the mind of a mass murderer, it showed me the possibilities of roleplaying as an effective means of therapy, and, more specifically, for increasing awareness and empathy in those who otherwise seem to have none.
 
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