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Society has became over sensitive, so INTPf reflects the real world

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#1
San Diego, California (CNN) -- Clarence Thomas has an abundance of two things that are often in short supply whenever Americans talk about race: courage and common sense.
The only African-American on the Supreme Court displayed both this week in speaking to a small gathering of students and faculty at Palm Beach Atlantic University, a nondenominational Christian school in Florida.
In a series of provocative and insightful comments about race that were first reported by Yahoo! News and confirmed by several people who attended the talk and heard the remarks firsthand, Thomas dropped a few bombshells.

Ruben Navarrette Jr.
This got people's attention because -- nearly 25 years after his bitter confirmation battle -- Thomas remains a lightning rod for controversy, and because he rarely speaks while on the bench. Apparently, he has been saving the best stuff for the public remarks that he delivers in more casual settings.
Like this one:
"My sadness is that we are probably today more race and difference-conscious than I was in the 1960s when I went to school," Thomas told the audience. "To my knowledge, I was the first black kid in Savannah, Georgia, to go to a white (Catholic) school. Rarely did the issue of race come up."
He went on to note that, these days, many Americans talk about race a lot and have a hair trigger on the subject.
Photos: Today's Supreme Court
Thomas: U.S. too 'sensitive' about race
"Now, name a day (race) doesn't come up," Thomas said. "Differences in race, differences in sex, somebody doesn't look at you right, somebody says something. Everybody is sensitive."
The sensitive include Samuel L. Jackson. In a cringe-inducing confrontation, Jackson scolded an entertainment reporter at a Los Angeles television station after the journalist, in asking about a Super Bowl commercial, appeared to confuse Jackson for another African-American actor -- Laurence Fishburne. Both actors had appeared in Super Bowl commercials, and the reporter seemed to get them mixed up.
"You're as crazy as the people on Twitter. I'm not Laurence Fishburne!" Jackson said during a live TV interview with KTLA's Sam Rubin. "We don't all look alike. We may be all black and famous, but we all don't look alike. You're busted."
Rubin immediately apologized for the mistake, but Jackson kept razzing him. It was overkill.
"I'm the other guy," the actor said. "There's more than one black guy doing a commercial. I'm the 'What's in your wallet?' black guy. He's the car black guy. Morgan Freeman is the other credit card black guy. You only hear his voice, though, so you probably won't confuse him with Laurence Fishburne."
It seemed to be all in good fun, but it was still hard to watch. Rubin made a mistake. But it looked like Jackson was the one with the problem.
Rubin did have some defenders. They include CNN's Don Lemon, who -- after a contentious exchange between guests on a show he was hosting -- seemed to agree with Thomas that "people are really sensitive when it comes to race."
Finally, Thomas took aim at a group that often gets a pass for its mistreatment of minorities that it claims to be helping.
"The worst I have been treated was by northern liberal elites," he said. "The absolute worst I have ever been treated, the worst things that have been done to me, the worst things that have been said about me, are by northern liberal elites, not by the people of Savannah, Georgia."
Only Thomas can speak to how he has been treated in his life, and who treated him worse. That is a personal matter. As one of the most conservative members of the High Court, he obviously has little respect for liberals. And the feeling is entirely mutual.
And yet, we can expect Thomas' observation about "northern liberal elites" to resonate with many other African-Americans and Latinos who have been criticized, attacked, or disparaged by this bunch for veering off the script of how minorities are supposed to think, speak and behave. Those minorities are often treated as defective in some way and certainly not representative of their respective communities. They're an aberration, an anomaly, a mistake.
Make no mistake. The friction here isn't about politics. It's about something more primal: control. Liberals wanted to give people like Clarence Thomas every right except, it turns out, the right to think for themselves. If you forget that, you'll be labeled a "sellout," a "traitor," a "right wingnut" or worse.
Most Americans probably look back on Thomas' confirmation hearings in the fall of 1991, and think that what made them so messy were those unseemly accusations of sexual harassment by Anita Hill. That was a sideshow. The real reason for the tension in those hearings was that Thomas represents something liberals can't stand: a black conservative.
Those on the left see conservatives of color as a kind of sociological experiment gone bad -- these are people who are ungrateful for the many opportunities they were provided by the liberal establishment which, in return, asked for only three things: undying loyalty, constant agreement, and lifelong subservience.
Thomas doesn't play that game. He never has. And that's why he is always at the center of the storm.
Follow us on Twitter @CNNOpinion.
Join us on Facebook/CNNOpinion.
The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of Ruben Navarrette.
http://www.cnn.com/2014/02/14/opinion/navarrette-clarence-thomas-race/index.html?hpt=hp_t4
 

redbaron

consummate salt-extraction specialist
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#2
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunning–Kruger_effect

It's funny because you're one of the whiniest little bitches I've ever seen on this forum. I guess that kind of supports your theory, that the forum is starting to reflect the real world, since people like yourself are starting to become ever more prolific in this place.
 
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#3
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunning–Kruger_effect

It's funny because you're one of the whiniest little bitches I've ever seen on this forum. I guess that kind of supports your theory, that the forum is starting to reflect the real world, since people like yourself are starting to become ever more prolific in this place.
I wouldn't go so far as to say that I am unskilled. I have even admitted to potentially overestimating my own ability. You could probably find a much better example for the epitome of the DK-effect. If an insane person starts to question his own sanity, you cannot really call him insane anymore, because he is starting to realize the truth.
 
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#4
I wouldn't go so far as to say that I am unskilled. I have even admitted to potentially overestimating my own ability. You could probably find a much better example for the epitome of the DK-effect. If an insane person starts to question his own sanity, you cannot really call him insane anymore, because he is starting to realize the truth.
No I'm the best example of the DK-Effect. Rb has it all wrong.
 

redbaron

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#5
You're the best example of the SK (super kute) effect.
 

Pyropyro

Magos Biologis
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#6
Hmm... that is quite a big claim. Wouldn't it be better to support such claim with a number of articles about different issues aside from racism?

There's also the question of which society is INTPf emulating.
 

Anktark

of the swarm
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#7
Since society lives in the real world, does the title mean that:

1) Society is becoming more like INTPs (overly sensitive).
xor
2) INTPs seem to be more objective, because the rest of society is becoming more subjective/biased?

I am not trying to be an arsehat, it's just hard to determine the OP's perspective from the title.

If it's the second option, there isn't much to discus- I have the impression that INTPs don't like to involve feelings into their arguments, debates and opinions. Not to say that INTPs are naturally objective- but we try as much as Ti allows.
 

Jennywocky

guud languager
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#8
I think he's just using this entire thread as some kind of protest over bannings and whatnot, to accuse the forum of being oversensitive.

IOW, more fucking drama.

This might have actually been an interesting discussion on its own merits.

I actually think the United States was homogeneous (rich elitist CHristian white guys in power) for so long that now with the Internet and so much celebration of diversity, we basically have broken down into zillions of tribal units each with our own identities and haven't yet begun to negotiate the work of unifying those units into one broad country again. It's an arduous, noisy process and will take some time.
 
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#10
Clarence Thomas is not who I would consider representative of the average person: he's an American supreme court justice, he's not dealing with the regular joe lifestyle and related problems.

Oversenstitive? Umm...Compared to what? I'd agree racism is less than what it was in the 60's (not that I was alive back then to observe it), but people are currently suffering and possibly losing their lives over racism and other -isms.

http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2013/jul/18/trayvon-martins-father-my-son-was-racially-profile/

Tracy Martin and Sybrina Fulton, the parents of slain 17-year-old Trayvon Martin, joined the “Today Show” to share their reaction to George Zimmerman’s acquittal.
Saturday’s verdict sparked nationwide protests by many who claim the teenager was stalked and killed primarily because he was black. His father agrees.
“Obviously, any time you have a person that makes an assumption that a person is up to no good, there’s some type of profiling there,” Martin’s father said. “Was he racially profiled? I think that, if Trayvon had been white, this wouldn’t have never happened so, obviously, race has played some type of role.” ...
“We thought that the killer of our unarmed child would be convicted,” Martin said. “I just didn’t understand how can you let the killer of an unarmed child go free? What would your verdict had been if it had been your child?”

http://www.tampabay.com/news/courts...ole-in-floridas-stand-your-ground-law/1233152


In 2006, Laurie Lynn Bartlett killed her boyfriend.

She said he was drunk and tried to sexually assault her. She put a knife in him and got 10 years.

A year later, Ernestine Broxsie killed her ex-boyfriend.

She said he "snapped" and began choking her, so she put a bullet in him. She went free.

Two similar cases with one big difference — Bartlett's victim was white, Broxsie's was black.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/23/us/native-americans-struggle-with-high-rate-of-rape.html?_r=0

Nationwide, an arrest is made in just 13 percent of the sexual assaults reported by American Indian women, according to the Justice Department, compared with 35 percent for black women and 32 percent for whites.


http://www.nydailynews.com/news/cri...atch-sexual-activity-sources-article-1.438225


http://www.foxnews.com/us/2010/08/1...taten-island-inflame-black-hispanic-tensions/


(I'm currently avoiding the news so I don't have the most recent stuff)
 
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