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Perhaps: An INTP's Blog

killurselfnao


  • Total voters
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  • Poll closed .

Absurdity

Prolific Member
Joined
Jul 22, 2012
Messages
2,358
#2
Welcome to the forum.

Continuing on: once I have amassed enough UNDERSTANDING of whatever the normal person would have learned in FOUR YEARS at a regular college, in what I assume to be hopefully half the time, I will apply for jobs, and well you can see where that's headed.
Unless you're studying something technical you don't really "learn" anything substantive in college. You do learn how to put up with nonsense, work within deadlines, etc.

More than anything though, a degree is a license to compete in the job market. I think you have a bit of a romanticized idea of how easy it will be to get a "job" with your DIY project (assuming by job you mean something sustainable in the long-term that can also be thought of as part of a career).

You can be a autodidact in college. I sure am. You could also learn a trade or some sort of technical skill that doesn't take 4 years and a waste of money. However hanging out at a library isn't something to put on a resume.
 

Ink

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 26, 2012
Messages
926
Location
svealand
#4
I have had no success trying to meditate personally, any recommendations on getting there? I thought about doing one of those transcendental meditation courses but the cost and phoniness puts me off...
 

Ink

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 26, 2012
Messages
926
Location
svealand
#5
Meh, phoniness makes me contemplate suicide.

What is that hinders you from being able to do so? Is it your wandering mind (fuck, im starting to sound like one of those phonies)? Or what? I'll take some details and go from there
I think it's mainly me not knowing what the goal is, I don't think I understand what the difference is to just lying down resting etc... Maybe my mind is usually relaxed? Lol
 

Analyzer

Hide thy life
Joined
Aug 23, 2012
Messages
1,241
Location
West
#6
Create a website with reviews of books, problem solving sets, coursework from online classes like coursra,edx, blogs, ect...

Put that on your resume and I'm sure employees will be more impressed then someone with a degree, especially in a non-technical field.
 

Etheri

Prolific Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2012
Messages
1,000
#7
Thoughts of worthy ideas that I have yet to see genuine threads on:

SUBVOCALIZATION

I believe this is what people are attempting to achieve when they meditate: the loss of the inner voice, the one that thinks, to let go, its really eliminating subvocalization (temporarily).
I cannot stop the voice inside my head. I can however read over words at insane rates, taking them in without subvocalisation. Please realise that, while you'll remember seeing these words before, your understanding will be pathetic. I have trouble trying to read maths / physics / chem too fast for me to keep up. For studying, slow and comprehensively reading a text once or twice does me much better than subvocalisation. However, once you've built up understanding regarding a subject, it's a very neat tool.

As far as meditation goes, I'm no good at meditating. However I love to lay down relaxed and ponder thoughts. I don't know how close this gets to meditation. Sometimes i'll reach periods of inner peace, where I am at rest with the world. I'd say it feels fairly great, but it only feels great to think back. When I am experiencing it, I don't feel much emotions at all. The voice is still there, the thoughts are still there too. The subvocalisation doesn't dissapear, the connotation attached to my thoughts does.

Each word loses it's connotation. Each sentence. The meaning remains, but the emotional value doesn't. And believe me, EVERYTHING has emotional value. You can think of the worst things that happened in your life, without even feeling slightly sad. It's only the fact that you break this pattern of sadness that makes you realise something is off. You can look at kitties without going d'awwww. I'd say it's completely objective thinking, but it's not. Think about all the things you always think, but without your own personal perspective.
 

Magus

Active Member
Joined
Mar 13, 2013
Messages
114
#9
Welcome to the forum.
Unless you're studying something technical you don't really "learn" anything substantive in college. You do learn how to put up with nonsense, work within deadlines, etc.

More than anything though, a degree is a license to compete in the job market. I think you have a bit of a romanticized idea of how easy it will be to get a "job" with your DIY project (assuming by job you mean something sustainable in the long-term that can also be thought of as part of a career).

You can be a autodidact in college. I sure am. You could also learn a trade or some sort of technical skill that doesn't take 4 years and a waste of money. However hanging out at a library isn't something to put on a resume.
Bear in mind I haven't read everything you have posted; but I have to echo Absurdity here.

It is quite common for INTPs to resist against bureaucratic top-down education models, as dysfunctional as they are; but simply refusing to play ball may not be the best approach, depending on what your goals are. If your interests are diverse and fluctuating (as many members of this forum are) then it might be possible to follow them while not totally abandoning formal education.

Don't get me wrong, I view a degree as only a piece of paper to which I personally attribute little value but I don't think its wise to minimise your options based on this analysis. Reality is, as broken as the system is, degrees are seen by others in a different light and us INTPs (especially while we're young) have to work within the world which others have created.

Also welcome to the forum :)
 

Rainer

Beaver Lake Linovecian
Joined
Apr 10, 2013
Messages
43
Location
Chicago (the intuitive side)
#10
Of course a degree is not at all a mark of actual intellectual merit or skill. It's just a credential that allows you to be given a bit of credit for the abilities you already have.

Not having a degree in a good technical field will probably mean that for most of your life, you will be working for blockheads less creative and visionary than yourself and doing their dumb bidding.

That might be the case with a degree as well, but having a degree in the right field may mean that you can actually use your standout INTP abilities in your job, like Introverted Thinking and Extroverted Intuition. There's plenty of advice about occupations on this forum. Most INTP-friendly fields pay well--meaning that if you can just get through the college education and work a few years, you may be able to save enough money to retire early (see Extreme Early Retirement blog for ideas.)

Unless you are totally happy doing whatever you feel like at the moment (and I feel that few INTPs are truly ok with this, in their hearts, since there's not much accomplishment or competence that comes with it), you're going to need to learn how to buckle down. For a while, you will have to fight each day the desire to follow your interests instead of completing your duties--but you don't have succeed all the time, just the times that matter. Learn how to figure out when it's ok to slack off and when it's really not.

Decide what your goal is and make a great effort to ignore, or address, if possible, the doubts about it that will inevitably spring up in your INTP mind.

I am 25, and I've dropped out of college twice already. I've been back in school a year, trying another time, and this time I've actually been able to stick to it and get straight A's in math and science courses. I realized a couple years ago that finishing college would only take about 7-10% of my remaining years of life, and I decided it was worth it.

You're an INTP in an ESFJ world. You have to conform yourself to it to a certain extent if you want to avoid misery, but you don't have to sell your soul.
 

The Introvert

Master of Perception
Joined
Dec 8, 2012
Messages
1,036
Location
L'eau
#11
The point of college isn't to learn skills, or gain knowledge, per se.

It's to meet people; create contacts, learn how to socialize, and deal with being an adult.

I agree with Absurdity:
I think you have a bit of a romanticized idea of how easy it will be to get a "job" with your DIY project (assuming by job you mean something sustainable in the long-term that can also be thought of as part of a career).
Not saying it isn't possible, but you're misunderstanding the point of university.
 

Etheri

Prolific Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2012
Messages
1,000
#12
@TimeAsylums ,

I notice you have deleted just about everything you wrote, and put up a rather depressing poll.

I'm not going to tell you what to do or what not to do, I simply wanted to state that I came back to this thread to reread your reaction to what I posted and reread your original post as I now had the time to think things through. If you ever read this and you still have the original text, feel free to put it back up, as while it was long I certainly enjoyed reading it.

If your stay on this forum was truly this short, then goodbye I guess. :rip:
 

Debra

Redshirt
Joined
Sep 12, 2014
Messages
3
#13
UOTE=Absurdity;364989]Welcome to the forum.I agree what is learned in college is pretty useless and we forget most of it. But I wonder if my intensity in studying things on my own might have been spurned from lots of studying in college. Like I learned to read, inquire, think, write about, dig. Or possibly it is my nature anyway. Possibly it is both. :confused:



Unless you're studying something technical you don't really "learn" anything substantive in college. You do learn how to put up with nonsense, work within deadlines, etc.

More than anything though, a degree is a license to compete in the job market. I think you have a bit of a romanticized idea of how easy it will be to get a "job" with your DIY project (assuming by job you mean something sustainable in the long-term that can also be thought of as part of a career).

You can be a autodidact in college. I sure am. You could also learn a trade or some sort of technical skill that doesn't take 4 years and a waste of money. However hanging out at a library isn't something to put on a resume.[/QUOTE]
 

Debra

Redshirt
Joined
Sep 12, 2014
Messages
3
#14
I have often asked - do you remember anything you learned In high school, besides reading, writing and basic math? To challenge their idea of education as so important. They have no answer, but I hope to challenge them to think things through more before spouting off clichés. Of course, the INTP dilemma, they wont think it through, they will just think I am weird .
 
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