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Opinions on these thoughts (written today and rather lazily)

GO97

Redshirt
Local time
Today, 17:02
Joined
Jan 5, 2018
Messages
5
#1
Living as an art

Living should be an invaluable art, we should envision ourselves as a self-conscious painting being brushed by the sophisticated biological and societal structures that arguably defines us, too many people today look on life as just a test to be passed or failed (only partly true at most), using all forms of classifying dichotomies such as the winners and losers, the wealthy and poor or even heaven and hell. This anxiety and tunnelling of reality stems from the human being’s primal fear of death, we cannot begin to understand how someone can cease to exist, although we rarely care to ponder on the miracle of becoming to be in the first place, and this incomprehension calls heavily on the intellect to cut down the world into smaller and more understandable pockets of reality that one can pick and choose to envelope as he whims. This form of simplification was necessary to survive as intelligent apes and get where we are today as modern human beings free from the wild and dominating the planet, but does this freedom, this departure from the chaos of the wild, mark the beginning of the end for the human potential or are we still on the cusp of a transcendent becoming. In my mind our leading societies of today have become so oriented around the tragedy of death and what follows the finished painting that we find ourselves simply living to die rather than to inspire and spark a flame for the coming generations who have unknowable potential.
 
Last edited:
Local time
Today, 19:02
Joined
Jan 14, 2018
Messages
1
Location
Sárospatak
#2
Re: Living as an art

Living should be an invaluable art, we should envision ourselves as a self-conscious painting being brushed by the sophisticated biological and societal structures that arguably defines us, too many people today look on life as just a test to be passed or failed (only partly true at most), using all forms of classifying dichotomies such as the winners and losers, the wealthy and poor or even heaven and hell. This anxiety and tunnelling of reality stems from the human being’s primal fear of death, we cannot begin to understand how someone can cease to exist, although we rarely care to ponder on the miracle of becoming to be in the first place, and this incomprehension calls heavily on the intellect to cut down the world into smaller and more understandable pockets of reality that one can pick and choose to envelope as he whims. This form of simplification was necessary to survive as intelligent apes and get where we are today as modern human beings free from the wild and dominating the planet, but does this freedom, this departure from the chaos of the wild, mark the beginning of the end for the human potential or are we still on the cusp of a transcendent becoming. In my mind our leading societies of today have become so oriented around the tragedy of death and what follows the finished painting that we find ourselves simply living to die rather than to inspire and spark a flame for the coming generations who have unknowable potential.
Cool thoughts! I agree on the fact that society views death from the wrong perspective, even over romanticizing it. I think the biggest problem with this is the fact that a significant part of the human population doesn't care about what will happen with the world after they are gone. Both nihilism and afterlife-based religious views fall into this category. But what if there's no afterlife? Life would still exist here, on Earth, even humans will certainly survive a few thousand years from here. I think they are just as much ME, as I am. There's an interesting question about the nature of consciousness: does it only stretches as far as my own personality? What about others? Aren't they experiencing the same kind of "Me"?
 
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