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important skills and values for outside world that are not taught in school

sushi

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what skills that are important in life and work you learned later on that are not taught in school?
( school is a shit place to learn about anything useful and worthwhile)

the one i know is knocking doors and handling rejection.

to reach success, one has to knock many doors and reach out/talk to strangers in order to convince them of your agenda and ideas.
 

Cognisant

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Taxes and how to optimize to pay less and get the most out of your tax return, indeed finance in general there's a lot of little ways to manage your money better and cut down on expenses.

Healthcare and insurance, it's good to know what your risks are and what's actually worthwhile getting insurance for. I'm very critical of insurance in general, the basic idea is good (risk mitigation) but private insurance is driven by profit and it's most profitable when it's all but an outright scam.

Especially for people coming out of school I strongly recommend investigating different industries to get an idea of what it's like to work in them, how sought after employees are and how qualified you need to be to actually get a job.
 

ZenRaiden

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Good way is to imagine roughly what you want your life to look like and act accordingly.
There is no point in learning things that will not get you the life you want.

Financial skills are not taught that is true. There are simple rules to financial skills and handling money, but if you do not follow them you are doomed to be losing money over stuff.

Dealing with people is up to you. If you are dealing with people you want to have some level of ability to navigate social structure and those are often different from what you have in schools.

Virtues and morals are not something you will get in school, but they can make a difference in life, but the down side is they require effort and by themselves they do not guarantee success. Ergo you can virtuous and moral and not be successful, and you can be immoral and no have no virtues and be a loser.

Schools rarely provide for developing talents outside of academic abilities.

Knowing the world is about experiencing the world, not what your parents and teachers or peers say.

Being healthy is a matter of being educated in health and visiting a doctor is far too late with health problems the best health approach is preventing sickness not getting sick and going to doctor yet most schools or parents have no idea what is best for peoples health.
Rotten teeth, osteoporosis, weak body, bad hygiene, poor nutrition, diabetes, heart problems, obesity are all too common with people now days and people rarely try to avert these. You often have doctors who are obese and smoking, yet they tell you to do the opposite.

Plus having some muscle and fitness as well as being mentally fit is pretty good in all manner of ways, but rarely do people in school get the benefit.
Usually fitness is means to an end such as being sexy or boosting confidence or just plain vanity, but very few people do it for all the great benefits for the body and mind.

Being open to ideas, humility, cooperation and leadership.
None of this is trained in school.

Thinking about life constructively as opposed to reactively.
Your average student has no rhyme or reason, no idea what to do with life and even when they do it is usually not something they really want, or worse do something because they have been told its a good idea. No understanding for real life and the consequences.

General knowledge. Despite teachers dumping loads of information on students very few teachers actually teach new or relevant information. You teacher is so out of date with his knowledge that whatever he tells you its probably yesterdays news.
 

moody

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There are two things that come to mind:

1. emotional intelligence
Ideally this is something parents should teach their children...but the world is far from perfect and parents can be really shitty or emotionally immature themselves. This falls in line with handling rejection/failing. Failing is given such enormous consequences to ambitious high school students that I've come across. Quite a few who will do anything to save a grade, and take as many shortcuts as they can because they're taking five or six different AP courses, plus extracurriculars, plus volunteer work. I wasn't much different, and I was a nervous, emotionless reck when I came out of high school.

2. applied realistic thinking
This goes along with applied emotional intelligence to me; in many of the academic settings i've been in, college and high school included, discussions and debates are often purely theoretical and don't take into account the way people actually work. Take economics: the whole premise is built off that people will act in their best interests, which just isn't true. Sure, they will often think they're acting in their best interests, but there is usually social manipulation, advertisements, individualized misconceptions, or other psychological factors (such as addictions, or severe mental illness) that inhibit people from doing whats best for themselves, financially.
 

sushi

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2. applied realistic thinking
This goes along with applied emotional intelligence to me; in many of the academic settings i've been in, college and high school included, discussions and debates are often purely theoretical and don't take into account the way people actually work. Take economics: the whole premise is built off that people will act in their best interests, which just isn't true. Sure, they will often think they're acting in their best interests, but there is usually social manipulation, advertisements, individualized misconceptions, or other psychological factors (such as addictions, or severe mental illness) that inhibit people from doing whats best for themselves, financially.

i agree with this, school teaches alot of ivory tower stuff and concepts.

most people seperate what they learn in school with reality they live in, and cant make connections between the two.
 

BurnedOut

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1. Financial prudence - a bit of accounting + knowing how taxes work + banking skills.

2. Knowing a bit of economics - to avoid being a complete moron at financial matters when it comes to analyzing investments or basic planning of your life + prevent getting defrauded by insurance agents / banking agents / getting duped by unscrupulous relatives and friends who have amazing ideas which keep failing + better financial planning skills

3. Being aware of what's going on - necessary skill and social skill - one should know the basic trends in politics and lawmaking or certain policies that are passed - making use of good government policies that you may not know if you are an inane dunderhead browsing instagram every waking moment of the day

4. Having a minimal online social life - trust me, keeps your head calmer and prevents you from wasting time and pursue time in your hobbies

5. Understanding that holidays in a week matter - Knowing how to relax is an important skill. It requires quite some strength and courage

6. Adequate social skills - to get a support system

7. Good social skills - to get more opportunities

8. Self-confidence - of course.

9. Autodidactism - a dedicated autodidact will be notches higher than everybody

10. Self control - you get it.

11. Working out - A must.

12. Good reading habits - keeps your mind from being sabotaged by social media, unnecessary media influence and useless people + helps in understanding your identity better

13. Hobbies - One of the most important things in life.

14. Philosophical belief - Provides a framework to your thinking + gives a sense of purpose + avoid overreliance on other's behaviours + free wisdom that comes along with it (well, I'd prefer prescribing beliefs such as utilitarianism or scientism or positivism and not bullshit like homeopathy, etc)

15. Stable relationships - with your family and people who are close to you

16. Healthy sense of being - good personal identity is always a good thing.

17. Openness and acceptance

18. Time organization skills
 

sushi

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Being a hustler and talking to strangers, or as i put it knocking doors

its important skill in sales, and everything
 

gilliatt

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The individual child, this idea, method, the child becomes the focus, the center of education. The teacher, a director, guides the child's own self-learning. Freedom for the child in education, so important. The Montessori Method, it is the simplicity of the method.
 

Elorian

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Taking a leaf out of Frank Herbert's book:

“Muad'Dib learned rapidly because his first training was in how to learn. And the first lesson of all was the basic trust that he could learn. It's shocking to find how many people do not believe they can learn, and how many more believe learning to be difficult. Muad'Dib knew that every experience carries its lesson.”


Coming into school, students seem to be bombarded with knowledge before they even know what to do with it. Within days, there's a whole load of content you need memorized, and you're expected to progress at the same rate as all the other students, whether or not it's actually true. The ones who get bad grades think they're dumb and get discouraged, and that is far more damaging than low IQ. Learning techniques and study strategies were never something I learned in school, and they are critical for many people to succeed. Referring back to ZenRaiden's answer, open-mindedness is also neglected, despite how essential it is.

Frankly, I think the whole education system is flawed almost irreparably. Everyone is just way too different. Going into Grade One, I was about 2 years ahead of my classmates since I had been at a very good school for Kindergarten. By Grade Three, I had entirely lost my advantage. The nerds, the sporty kids, and everyone else just get stuck in the same class and learn the same things in the same way. People get taught things that they don't want to learn and that won't help them in their career. Another big factor here is all the connotations associated with school as a result of this generalization. Despite a young interest in science, the fact that I learned it in the same place as Social and English killed it for me, and I was unable to reacquire that interest until high school. (I'm glad to say that I no longer despise English and Social Studies) Yes, there are advanced schools for particular subjects, and that's a very good thing, but I think the whole system needs to be organized more like that.

Anyways, I am highly open to critique, feel free to provide constructive criticism on my answer if you have a different view or a more experienced and tested opinion.
 
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