• OK, it's on.
  • Please note that many, many Email Addresses used for spam, are not accepted at registration. Select a respectable Free email.
  • See https://www.intpforum.com/threads/upgrade-at-10-am-gmt.27631/

Help from Medical INTP's Please

Nixi

Redshirt
Local time
Tomorrow, 00:52
Joined
Sep 28, 2017
Messages
3
Hi
I'm new to this but had a question about work and being an INTP
I'm currently a senior anaesthetic registrar in australia
Now there are lots of things being an INTP that help with my job - I'm really good at problem solving and thinking outside the box but I struggle sometimes with the profession trying to tell me how to behave and try and box me in to be what they think I should be rather than appreciating that I think differently than most people. I also find it hard at times to deal with people that are really 'type A' and aggressive because I tend to just go with the flow unless i'm really passionate about something.
I'm interested in what peoples thoughts are and if anyone has some suggestions of how to overcomes some of these INTP issues!!
Thanks,
Nix
 

Cognisant

Prolific Member
Local time
Today, 03:52
Joined
Dec 12, 2009
Messages
8,271
I struggle sometimes with the profession trying to tell me how to behave and try and box me in to be what they think I should be rather than appreciating that I think differently than most people.
Sounds like you're having trouble socializing with your coworkers because you're not meeting their expected level of clinical professionalism which you attribute to your MBTI type, I'm sorry to say that is both wrong and frighteningly immature from someone in your position.

I suggest socializing outside of work and meeting your colleges expectations or finding a different profession.


On second thought I'm assuming too much, please elaborate on what you mean by "trying to tell me how to behave and try and box me in", what do you think they expect of you? I know being expected to be emotionally invested or at least appear to be emotionally invested is an unfair expectation medical professionals often have to face.
 

Nixi

Redshirt
Local time
Tomorrow, 00:52
Joined
Sep 28, 2017
Messages
3
I can see why you call yourself cognisant. Thanks for your honest reply - by the way im not frighteningly immature for someone in my position by attributing a lack of clinical professionalism to my personality type - why? because I don't lack clinical professionalism. I'm very passionate about my job, i'm in it for the patients which I always have great rapport with and I don't actually have any trouble socialising with coworkers I get along with most people I work with. I'm one of the most lay back type of people you could possibly meet.

It's more that I get frustrated because there's such a narrow concept of what people think constitutes professionalism in medicine and there is so much arrogance. The concept of professionalism in medicine changes depending on how senior you are. I call it 'selective professionalism' Someone can be completely unprofessional as a consultant and no one does anything (ie talk down to coworkers). As a trainee you say one incorrect nuance (for example I'm quite casual in my communication) and you get called up on it. Because i'm so emotionally invested in my job because I'm so passionate about patient care/ health and have worked so hard to get to where I am, I find the 'system' so hypocritical.
Sure I need to 'play the game' to finish my training (1 year left) but I don't really have any respect for the politics/ system. About 20% of my 'colleagues' as you put it - I wouldn't have anything to do with them, they're arrogant hypocrits with no principles
 

Polaris

Radioactive vision
Local time
Today, 03:52
Joined
Oct 13, 2009
Messages
2,092
Not quite the same, but I have background as a dental hygienist which means I spent ten years in patient care. One of my biggest sources of frustration was the arrogance of people 'above' me, coupled with the frequent occurrence of mistakes on their part. I kind of lost my respect for the profession when I had to cover up for them on numerous occasions. It was a somewhat frequent complaint from their side that I spent "too much time talking with the patients". The patients feedback was that they came out of my treatment room illuminated and more willing to subject themselves to treatment they had previously resisted, because things had not been explained to them properly before.

I always had plans with my career path though, and that included not being restricted to the profession for the rest of my life. At the time, the degree guaranteed you work and a lucrative income, which means I decided to enrol in the course with the long-term aim of using this work as a means to acquire a bachelor degree in science without having to subject myself to years of debt payments.

And so I proceeded, but I overstayed my time as a dental hygienist, and ended up making myself very ill due to crazy pressures and long working hours. I quit and started a science degree which took me quite some time as I had to work to support the studies on a wage that was 1/3 of what I used to earn.

But it has payed off. I have finished the degree and can now carry on with research projects as I please. I work in a mediocre job, but have three research papers in the making, so I am still doing what I want. And yes, there are arrogant people in this field, although I cannot say I have met that many. One of the people I thought to be the most arrogant also turned out to be one of my most enthusiastic supporters, so I was proven wrong.

I think people in the medical and dental industry are often taught that they are some kind of gods - I noticed that when I attended dental school and had to work side by side with dentistry students. Later, in my work in Australia, the sexism I experienced was unbelievable. I realised I was not hired for my skills at all, and my skills were not valued - what was valued was how many patients I could squeeze in in one day and the profits generated as a result. The typical short-term stupid thinking typical for people in small businesses.

What was not considered was that the extra time spent talking to the patients generated more long-term profits as these patients acquired trust in the practice and therefore committed themselves to long-term expensive restorative work. This was proven in the increased patient retention during my time there, but nobody acknowledged this and instead attributed it to my "Nordic looks"... At this point I had enough and left, completely disillusioned with the field and feeling like a piece of shit.

This arrogance and greed doesn't seem to be the case as much with scientists, but that depends entirely on the field, of course...and perhaps which university you have attended :rolleyes:

Suggestions? I don't really know - it really depends on your skills in navigating the minefield that is the industry you are in. If people are calling you out for being "too casual" that sounds like bullshit and I would ignore it. It's almost as if people higher up are afraid the younger professionals are minimising the gaps between the ranks....well, welcome to the modern world where most intelligent people don't pay attention to where on the ladder you are.

For those who do care - I don't pay attention to them. As a general rule, I pay minimal attention to those above me, and concentrate on my work and good relations with people beside me. On the rare occasion my boss pulls me aside and rattles off something about procedures - I nod and smile and go back to doing things exactly as I have before if there was nothing of substance in their speech. It might be the death of me one day, but so far I have survived...

Respect and professionalism is generated only through your integrity and dedication. If you are as passionate and dedicated as you are, it will pay off - the major challenge is not getting sucked into politics. I avoided this by not socialising with or befriending colleagues. In my work, I keep most people at arm's length - it doesn't matter what the job is. As soon as you acquire friends, people will try to get you in on their 'side', so I tread the line between friendliness and friendship very carefully.
 

Nixi

Redshirt
Local time
Tomorrow, 00:52
Joined
Sep 28, 2017
Messages
3
Thanks Polaris,
I think you've pretty much hit the nail on the head. I think some superiors don't like it when our generation tries to bridge the gap between the ranks and view it as a lack or respect or a loss of culture which isn't actually the case.
I agree -Trying not to get sucked into politics is so difficult sometimes, especially when you want to change the system because of it's flaws yet you're perceived as too junior for anyone to take you seriously... the joys of modern medicine.
Once people know me and realise I have a lot of integrity and passion, and I'm doing it for the right reason etc - people are generally very suppportive. It's just getting that initial trust...
 
Top Bottom