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From Humanities/Social Sciences to Math/Theoretical Sciences?

Joined
Apr 28, 2017
Messages
5
#1
Hello fellow INTPs! I'll try to keep this as short as possible.

It's been a year since I graduated with a Master's. Technically to everyone I should be getting a job, but I absolutely detest finding work nowadays. I have been rejected by the government too many times (I suspect it has to do with some background checks), and in the private sector, I couldn't find a job that's valuable to me (heck, I can't even clinch an offer at all!). I find it much more difficult with degrees in Philosophy and Politics, and worse off, I hate networking and I hate meeting new people with an ulterior motive.

I'm currently 25 and for an Asian girl, I'm considered pretty old. I'm not sure if I should change myself or remain myself, because I've been thinking I only have 1 life to live and I can't afford to make mistakes anymore. I battled with myself over changing myself to fit in the corporate world, but I can't even get myself to do that (I think INTPs who eventually fit in the corporate world changed themselves unconsciously). I thought about being an entrepreneur but I hate networking, and I hate it so much I'd rather be a junior admin or something.

And here comes my question. As an INTP (at least I believe I'm not mistyped), I believe we have talents in math and science. I've been thinking of self-learning math/physics and eventually going back to academia, but I'm not sure if I'm being too idealistic and crazy. I don't have a proper background in math/science since middle school since I went on to choose humanities/social sciences majors, but I've always been fascinated with math and theoretical physics. My greatest personal heroes would have to be Feynman and Einstein (especially with my obsession of geniuses - I literally wish I could be one!). I'd have to admit I didn't do extremely well for math/science (just pretty well) in school, and the last time I excelled in it was before I hated my insane math and science teacher at the age of 9. Plus, I'd think it's because of how math/science is taught in Asia - it's just a matter of arbitrary rules and I hated anything that doesn't have a meaning behind it.

What do you think? Anyone has any advice for me? And sorry for the long read + thanks in advance!
 
Joined
Apr 20, 2017
Messages
32
#2
I can't answer everything but I can say that I suggest realistically considering your talents and options including how acceptable going back to school would be etc. and decide on a career that you would be okay with that pays reasonably and has openings.

For example, one of my friends is a Chinese and Biochemistry double major that really doesn't want to work in research and she has decided to go back to school for teaching as it is a good enough and fun enough job for the lifestyle she desires. She can't say whether she is equipped to learn engineering which has better pay and does not want to risk wasting more time.

Also, working in the corporate world does not take away what makes you who you are. You may have to act more sociably than you desire, but that's life and you won't forget who you are and can be yourself in your free time.
 

Architect

Professional INTP
Joined
Dec 25, 2010
Messages
6,692
#4
HI'm currently 25 and for an Asian girl, I'm considered pretty old.
Maybe you should be a comedian. That's a good start there.

And here comes my question. As an INTP (at least I believe I'm not mistyped), I believe we have talents in math and science. I've been thinking of self-learning math/physics and eventually going back to academia, but I'm not sure if I'm being too idealistic and crazy. I don't have a proper background in math/science since middle school since I went on to choose humanities/social sciences majors,
I did that - Humanities geek with no Science background. Switched to physics and got into a top drawer PhD program. However I was younger, about 21 when I switched, and was out by the time I was 25 or 26 (switched again to engineering and landed a job at the top engineering company of the day (the Google of the time)).

It was hard - really fucking hard. Nearly killed myself getting into that PhD program. And was there with guys from Princeton who had been solving differential equations with mothers milk. I couldn't compete, didn't have enough stick time on the subject compared to them, fundamentally they had a fine intuitive grasp of the material I didn't have.

My feeling is that it gets exponentially harder as you get out of your teens - depending on your background and what you go into. If you wanted to be a concert pianist the answer is obviously no. Math/Sci - possible, but pretty hard. Law? Sure, a lot of work but not a problem.

So I hate to rain on your idea, but realistically yes you can do it, but it will cost, and you'll be against people who didn't take that approach.

I lucked out. Made it by the skin of my teeth and was the best decision I ever made. But I barely switched in time.
 

Cognisant

Condescending Bastard
Joined
Dec 12, 2009
Messages
7,589
#5
Study to become an electrician, they make loads of money and if later down the line you want to become a physicist it'll help, or at very least you could end up in a supporting role.
 
Joined
Apr 28, 2017
Messages
5
#6
I can't answer everything but I can say that I suggest realistically considering your talents and options including how acceptable going back to school would be etc. and decide on a career that you would be okay with that pays reasonably and has openings.

For example, one of my friends is a Chinese and Biochemistry double major that really doesn't want to work in research and she has decided to go back to school for teaching as it is a good enough and fun enough job for the lifestyle she desires. She can't say whether she is equipped to learn engineering which has better pay and does not want to risk wasting more time.

Also, working in the corporate world does not take away what makes you who you are. You may have to act more sociably than you desire, but that's life and you won't forget who you are and can be yourself in your free time.
Sandglass, that's some pretty good advice there! "Realistically" is key. And that last paragraph really spoke to me, thanks :)
 
Joined
Apr 28, 2017
Messages
5
#8
Maybe you should be a comedian. That's a good start there.
:cool: That truly looks like the most viable option for me.

I did that - Humanities geek with no Science background. Switched to physics and got into a top drawer PhD program. However I was younger, about 21 when I switched, and was out by the time I was 25 or 26 (switched again to engineering and landed a job at the top engineering company of the day (the Google of the time)).

It was hard - really fucking hard. Nearly killed myself getting into that PhD program. And was there with guys from Princeton who had been solving differential equations with mothers milk. I couldn't compete, didn't have enough stick time on the subject compared to them, fundamentally they had a fine intuitive grasp of the material I didn't have.

My feeling is that it gets exponentially harder as you get out of your teens - depending on your background and what you go into. If you wanted to be a concert pianist the answer is obviously no. Math/Sci - possible, but pretty hard. Law? Sure, a lot of work but not a problem.

So I hate to rain on your idea, but realistically yes you can do it, but it will cost, and you'll be against people who didn't take that approach.

I lucked out. Made it by the skin of my teeth and was the best decision I ever made. But I barely switched in time.
Architect, I'm amazed at your life story. You're a genius yourself already, but solving differential equations with mothers' milk? Damn. :eek:

And given that this happened years ago when there weren't a lot of available resources out there... Now the chances of me doing well in math/sci all over again would be much less given the fact that there are a lot of people out there with all the right resources found on the internet nowadays - I might just find myself struggling with anxiety/regret if ever I find myself stumbling on this path!

But enough about my self-doubt. I'm curious - why did you abandon the Humanities though?
 
Joined
Apr 28, 2017
Messages
5
#9
Study to become an electrician, they make loads of money and if later down the line you want to become a physicist it'll help, or at very least you could end up in a supporting role.
Now that's a really good idea, given that my dad is an electrical engineer himself!