• OK, it's on.
  • Please note that many, many Email Addresses used for spam, are not accepted at registration. Select a respectable Free email.
  • Done now. Domine miserere nobis.

autodidact and self learning/practicing

sushi

Well-Known Member
Local time
Today, 10:24
Joined
Aug 15, 2013
Messages
878
my advice on self learning and practice / a skill or knowledge
based on my experience, spending 20- 40 minutes a day on a subject is enough to master it, but one has to be consistent and do it consistently


the minimum amount of time frame to grasp something is about 2-3 years, maxium around 6. this is akin to the 10000 hr rule

finally keep a progress journal at the end of the week, or end of 2 weeks, or month. the journal is for summarizing how much you effort you spent at learning the subject, also to vent your frustrations, and diifficulties you met whilelearning the subject.

its purpose is to reccord and keep track of my efforts /progress/lack of progress after every week or month has passed.

for example if you wasted a whole week or whole month doing something else and not on learning or practicing the subject, you will inevitably get frustrated after the week/month has passed, and reccording this on a journal will ease your frustrations and not squander the next week/month.
 

Animekitty

baby marshmallow born today
Local time
Today, 03:24
Joined
Apr 4, 2010
Messages
6,781
Location
Dandelion field
I put in at least 3 hours a day just to mental effort alone. Improving my thinking by thinking more. Of course, it is not directed specifically to any one form of thinking. But is highly personalized. I only think about things dealing with my interests. Too many subjects exist so I've become a semi generalist. Not specializing too much.
 
Local time
Today, 19:24
Joined
Jul 23, 2018
Messages
65
If I want to learn something, I start from first principles.

Determine what particular phenomena/effect I want to understand and then build the causal chain that leads to expression of that phenomena/effect.

For example, I know nothing about pharmacology but say I want to learn about how the effects caused by some drug occur.

First I have to know if there are any enzymes in the digestive tract or elsewhere which can cleave the molecule before it is absorbed into the bloodstream or anything else that changes the chemical composition of the molecule before it is absorbed into the bloodstream.

Then let's treat the absorption of the molecule or submolecule and cleaving of the molecule by some enzyme, if any, as a black box and proceed from there.

Now it's absorbed into the bloodstream. Okay. How does it reach the particular area we are looking at? How much of the initial drug reaches the area?

Once it reaches that area, I can start to hone in on the particular effect that it's supposed to cause.

That effect is caused by the absence or increased presence of some other molecule. If there's anything else(?) I can go back to this point and revise what I want to look for.

So we have black boxes again.
1) How does the absence/increased presence of the molecules result in the phenomena we are observing?
2) How does the presence of the molecules or submolecules of the drug lead to the absence/increased presence of the other molecules which supposed lead to the above phenomenon being expressed.
And as we explore further, we zoom in further and further to the actual thing we are interested in and treat the rest as black boxes.

I see this as akin to an iterative process where you are trying to proof something. You have something on one side and you want to be able to get to that thing by means manipulation and transform of some other thing on the other side.

In summary, it's seems uncannily similar to an exercise in computing cohomology groups. -> That statement makes sense to me in my head but in order to have it comprehensible in the outside world I need to define and qualify a lot of things. i.e. I have to do just what I mentioned. I'm working on it. I just wanted to throw it out there. See homotopy type theory.

The process I mentioned above seems to work for pretty much everything. Anyone can think of any exceptions?
 

sushi

Well-Known Member
Local time
Today, 10:24
Joined
Aug 15, 2013
Messages
878
I am guessing i can learn 10 pages of information in a month, which i limit myself. photocopy 10 pages from a target book and read them repeatedly for a month.

the process is microlearning or microprogress, learn a little everyday and not overwhelm yorself too mcuh, and develop a habit. forcing oneself to learn alot in a small period of time is doomed to fail and is akin to cramming system in school.

you might start with very small or infintisimal progress, but eventually the rate of learning becomes a exponential function, rather than linear. the key is patience. there are also ups and downs.
 
Local time
Today, 19:24
Joined
Jul 23, 2018
Messages
65
I am guessing i can learn 10 pages of information in a month, which i limit myself. photocopy 10 pages from a target book and read them repeatedly for a month.
I don't see why anyone would want to limit themselves to something like this. What in the world do you learn if you keep reading the same thing over and over again? There is no thinking being done, it seems more akin to rote memorization.
 

sushi

Well-Known Member
Local time
Today, 10:24
Joined
Aug 15, 2013
Messages
878
its more a target of

how much can you learn per week,
how much can you learn per 2 weeks
how much can you learn per month
how much can you learn per 2 months


, and recording the progress you make on a journnal.

beyond 3 months is too long

but for me, yes there is an element of route learning because reading something repeatedly helps one understand it.

the trick is not too set too much to learn within a short amount of time and overload yourself in the beginning, because like i said before its an exponential curve,.
 
Local time
Today, 19:24
Joined
Jul 23, 2018
Messages
65
I try not to measure what I learn in that way.

How I do it is simply to address whatevers questions pop up in my head and if I come to some point where I can't proceed because the details are either fuzzy or nonexistent, I know it's time to go look it up somewhere.


With every seemingly new thing that you have, there is an extent to which you can derive its understanding from things you already know. But you will hit an edge and you know that's a sign for you to assimilate some more stuff.

Usually it means that you are missing some fundamental operation of manipulation to get from one thing to another.


These are key ideas, sort of akin to transformations or a non-trivial mapping that allows you to approach that thing in a new way.

Usually what that implies is that the substrate upon which you are performing the logical deduction is transformed.


And if you want to learn something that does not arise from natural questions then it's probably because you feel it necessary to know whatever that thing is for societal reasons. Maybe all your friends know it or maybe your teacher wants you to learn it or maybe it will help get you a job.

For me those reasons usually don't lead to the individually being able to successfully learn anything at all but to become a mere parroteer of that body of knowledge.

I understand why many would proceed anyway because the societal benefit for having done so is too great. It's a matter of priorities, really.

But given how on edge the world is right now, critical infrastructures which provide you with things you are used to taking for granted may fail without warning, very suddenly and then basically we have to fend for ourselves and I think being able to learn fast and react under those circumstances is very important.

A lot of human beings alive today, especially in developed parts of the world forget that most of the reason we are alive and unencumbered in our activities is because of the collective efforts of individuals and groups who work tirelessly to keep critical infrastructure and supply chains working at all times. But these systems are so fragile. Have a few issues come up at the same time and the whole thing topples over.

How many of us have any knowledge of how to hunt wild game or fish or grow vegetables and that sort of thing? So many of us live so far removed from the "ground zero" where all these basic necessities are procured or produced.

Modern supply chains. Big achievement of mankind.
 

sushi

Well-Known Member
Local time
Today, 10:24
Joined
Aug 15, 2013
Messages
878
I am not revealing what am trying to learn yet, but i will eventually, Betrand russell's bartender.

try to sleep at night with the book/material you plan to study below your pillow, it really helps.
 
Top Bottom