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Old 20th-May-2017, 01:03 AM   #1
Artsu Tharaz
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Default A Description of Psychosis

During psychosis one becomes thrust into a sequence of events which go beyond the boundaries of normal experience. These occurrences are based on events occurring beyond the surroundings of the individual, and have a quality to them which demands that action be taken. They involve the full timeline of the individual, providing a sense of destiny/purpose that is being fulfilled as a result of all roads taken up until that point. The story may involve other people and speculations are carried out that suggest certain behind the scenes processes involving those people. The individual may feel that they are unlocking powers that they did not know they had, often involving the imagination. The imagination features prominently in psychosis, with the overall story being played out as well as events being imagined and said imaginings having the distinct feeling of influencing events, or of providing knowledge and important information. During psychosis, events change in their scope – the importance given to the events unfolding is felt to be so great that sacrifices must be made in terms of one’s social standing for example – it is a period of high risk. Strong emotions are felt during this time, from euphoria to terror, often in response to the perceived unfolding of events that will occur in the future. The overall experience is akin to that of a dream, with variations between a blur and sharp perception. The dreamlike nature is also brought in in that the events occurring go outside of what is normally believed to be possible or likely, and instead form associatively with little censoring based on what has happened in the past. It is as if the world is fundamentally albeit temporarily shifting in its nature in the highly intense and unpredictable course which is playing out. The nature of the story being told can lead to a sense that one is being given highly privileged information from an outside source, and one must respond to this information to produce the optimal outcome for the future.

However, by the conclusion of the episode, things return to a more normal state, often with a feeling of disappointment accompanying it, as the highly alive state during the psychosis is curbed into fatigue and making sense of the previous events. Rather than being at the mercy of the story being created by the psyche, one now becomes once again at the mercy of the consensus reality portrayed by others. When an episode of psychosis comes on again, the story being told will be markedly different from the previous one, but form something of a natural progression with it. So the life of the schizophrenic comes in peaks and troughs, with the peaks being highly intense, and a lingering train of thought operating during the troughs. Ultimately one integrates the sense of destiny felt at the high periods more and more into their day-to-day life, but the outcomes are far from set in stone, and likely depend on how well the individual played their hand during the intense times. It is uncertain as to what the overall meaning and purpose is behind these experiences, but one thing is for sure – they make life a hell of a lot more interesting.
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Old 20th-May-2017, 01:16 AM   #2
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Default Re: A Description of Psychosis

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they make life a hell of a lot more interesting
Truth.. the most random shit happens on meth. You could make a very successful new show on Adult Swim filming the day to day grind.
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Old 20th-May-2017, 03:53 AM   #3
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Default Re: A Description of Psychosis

Thank you for that very interesting phenomenology of psychosis post
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Old 20th-May-2017, 06:26 AM   #4
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Default Re: A Description of Psychosis

Sounds fun. Wouldn't mind hearing from others who've experienced psychosis as well. IIRC their experiences were less positive.

Religious people also experience these states of heightened purpose and meaning/destiny (as well as euphoria, etc). And Ni supposedly is all about destiny and deep connections. I want to know how these 'normal' experiences are differentiated from medical psychosis. Can someone who knows stuff weigh in?
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Old 20th-May-2017, 08:14 AM   #5
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Default Re: A Description of Psychosis

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Originally Posted by cheese View Post
Sounds fun. Wouldn't mind hearing from others who've experienced psychosis as well. IIRC their experiences were less positive.

Religious people also experience these states of heightened purpose and meaning/destiny (as well as euphoria, etc). And Ni supposedly is all about destiny and deep connections. I want to know how these 'normal' experiences are differentiated from medical psychosis. Can someone who knows stuff weigh in?
The description of course comes from personal experience. I cannot say that it's all positive, because there is a lot of fear associated with paranoia common to psychosis, but I think the common theme is that it's intense rather than strictly positive or negative.

Part of why I want to get my description of psychosis out there actually is so I can determine just how different it is from, say, Ni in a heightened state. Ni is so imaginative and out there, that it seems like it could easily seem like a psychosis with some of the ways it works.

Speaking as an Ni type, I find the medical description of psychosis faulty because:
- delusions are defined as fixed false beliefs, but Ni tends towards making guesses, rather than fixing upon a particular belief, so calling it delusional seems a misnomer
- I've personally never experienced hallucinations apart from hypnogogic hallucinations which are within the realm of normal experience
- thought disorder always seemed strange to me - personally I think the term has been applied to me because I "overthink" (overuse of Ti) which makes the thoughts come out in a hard to understand manner (and the purpose of spilling out the thoughts is because I believe at the time that the person I am telling them to will be able to help me make sense of them)
- negative symptoms... well, the start of the psychotic process was, and often is, a falling apart of one's life - basically it starts out as bad as it will get, so I became depressed for a while, but it wasn't too different to how I've been for many years

So, I guess I'd like to see if other INxJ types have had similar experiences without it being labelled as psychosis, i.e. if this is actually just on the more extreme end of normal. It's basically an intense, dream-like experience - dream-like in terms of perceptual experience and being embedded within an automatically generated story.

Also, schizophrenia has been termed as a "spiritual emergency":
http://realitysandwich.com/1800/spiritual_emergencies/
http://www.grof-holotropic-breathwor...hizophrenia-as
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Old 20th-May-2017, 12:18 PM   #6
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Default Re: A Description of Psychosis

I can see where your experience may be colored by Ni/Se, perhaps it greater correlates with limited contact with the external world for INxJs, but I would hesitate to say that it is normal. The outcome of the described episode seems it has a high potential for violence to erupt from a paranoid-anxious flight or fight response.


The media does seem to recognize this fatal archetype, as it is apparent in films like Videodrome, They Live, and Total Recall and Camus' novel The Stranger, which you may or may not see as examples of Ni/Se type characters. These symptoms are also present in people who claim/are claimed to be under mind control.
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Old 20th-May-2017, 12:59 PM   #7
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Default Re: A Description of Psychosis

Maybe psychosis manifests differently for different types.
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Old 20th-May-2017, 08:45 PM   #8
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Default Re: A Description of Psychosis

The dependent's psychosis rarely agrees with consensus reality. It's its own unique paranoid vision, with boundary dissolution, and ignoring certain other rules and logistics, worst case scenario. It doesn't do that much and is just thinking about the world in a certain way. There's nothing superhuman about it and originates from a time where that kind of thinking in a so called primitive society can pass off as having meaning to explain any good or bad thing that happens. In that way there's an attempt to control it by having things be connected in a way. It must be what's going on for anything to make sense. Terence McKenna described the two types of schizophrenia in the Invisible Landscape in which the healed schizophrenic essentially becomes a shaman because they can't unsee the symptoms. But not every schizophrenic makes the recovery. Hopefully for people who experience that make it out okay and become great without getting screwed over by society. I guess a few popular ones throughout history have become artists or or other public personas. Ni is just about the relationship between things. People want so badly to believe it all means something they can go down a bad route trying to prove it or enact it otherwise. It's just bad luck when it becomes public like and a little immature. That's what the medicine is for, to ideally put the person back in line for the over excitability. It shouldn't really become a public act.
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Old 21st-May-2017, 04:04 AM   #9
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Default Re: A Description of Psychosis

After having a few brief psychotic episodes, I found out it's my mind failing to properly make sense of my sensual experience, yet without any indication or insight of being handicapped or limited. A crazy example, I noticed that I couldn't see the sun moving, and made a strong conclusion that it was stuck in the sky and I made a big discovery that nobody has ever noticed.

I know two other people who have schizophrenia, and I notice it's hard for them (and myself) to critique our own thoughts. Things are absolutely true because we had the thought, or in other words, it's a hard thing to admit to ourselves that we could be wrong.

Quote:
Speaking as an Ni type, I find the medical description of psychosis faulty because:
- delusions are defined as fixed false beliefs, but Ni tends towards making guesses, rather than fixing upon a particular belief, so calling it delusional seems a misnomer
Actually, a delusion is defined as a belief that is clearly wrong or extremely bizarre, and yet the sufferer will not and cannot change their mind about it. For instance, when arguing against someone who says small birds are conspiring to kidnap him/her and take them to the crematory, the confrontation makes them believe their delusion even more, and there is no way of changing their mind about it.
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