• OK, it's on.
  • Please note that many, many Email Addresses used for spam, are not accepted at registration. Select a respectable Free email.
  • See https://www.intpforum.com/threads/upgrade-at-10-am-gmt.27631/

Search results

  1. The Grey Man

    My Theory of Everything, Expressed in Layman's Terms

    The pure concepts are abstracted from their transcendental schemata, time and space. For Kant, the cause of an appearance is, by definition, that appearance which constantly precedes it in time—no time, no causality. The Humean notion of causality is empirical in origin; the Kantian one is...
  2. The Grey Man

    My Theory of Everything, Expressed in Layman's Terms

    Kant distinguishes between intuition and judgment, between what actually appears and our interpretations of what appears. Space and time are the formal conditions of our intuitions, which are sensations that may be simultaneous or successive in relation to each other; the categories or pure...
  3. The Grey Man

    My Theory of Everything, Expressed in Layman's Terms

    I think consciousness is, objectively speaking, a causal medium between sensibility and action, the narrow strait that connects the spheres of sensibility (afferent activity of external stimuli) and will (efferent activity of the body). It is unified because the organism coordinates its bodily...
  4. The Grey Man

    My Theory of Everything, Expressed in Layman's Terms

    @DoIMustHaveAnUsername? I guess I just don't get it. What, if any, is the difference between real appearances and false ones that are really conceptual interpretations if there is no distinguishing between appearances and interpretations, between appearances and thoughts about appearances? if I...
  5. The Grey Man

    My Theory of Everything, Expressed in Layman's Terms

    The appearance of the snake cannot possibly have been wrong, because it didn't tell me anything. It did not speak to me and say, "Here is a snake. This will always be a snake." Nor does the rope inform us of anything besides the mere appearance of the rope itself. It is we who may be wrong or...
  6. The Grey Man

    My Theory of Everything, Expressed in Layman's Terms

    Because the appearance of the rope is richer than that of the snake, more predictions can be made about it. Because I can hold it in my hands and smell it rather than just glimpsing it, memory of past ropes can assist me in manipulating it. This doesn't mean that the glimpse of the snake was...
  7. The Grey Man

    My Theory of Everything, Expressed in Layman's Terms

    Popper seems everywhere to speak of theories as systems of hypotheses the falsification of the more specific of which eo ipso falsifies the more general (e.g. a white male raven is sufficient demonstrate that not all ravens are black). Where does he explain how a hypothesis can be promoted to...
  8. The Grey Man

    My Theory of Everything, Expressed in Layman's Terms

    I don't think that the rope is actually a snake or vice versa. I think that what had appeared at first glance to be a snake assumed, upon closer inspection, the appearance of a rope. My perception of the snake-rope may have been enriched—perhaps I saw its braiding, felt its texture as I held it...
  9. The Grey Man

    My Theory of Everything, Expressed in Layman's Terms

    How could experience be other than what it appears to be? Is not what is experienced, by definition, apparent, or phenomenal? If I say that objects appear to be simultaneous, is this not another way of saying that I experience them as such? Put another way, why distinguish at all between the...
  10. The Grey Man

    My Theory of Everything, Expressed in Layman's Terms

    @DoIMustHaveAnUsername? To say that my vision is not unbounded, but appears to be, or that the objects I see at present are not simultaneous, but appear to be, seems to me to be a distinction without a difference. Such distinctions may become meaningful by "vision," we understand the visible...
  11. The Grey Man

    My Theory of Everything, Expressed in Layman's Terms

    How can I contain You?
  12. The Grey Man

    My Theory of Everything, Expressed in Layman's Terms

    The Christian-Platonic conclusion from this, of course, is that we are all inwardly the same, emanations of the same God, though outwardly different. I feel immense sympathy for Thomas Browne, who not only stressed the primacy of immediate "ocular Observation" in science, as Goethe and Fries...
  13. The Grey Man

    My Theory of Everything, Expressed in Layman's Terms

    If the "I" is the experience itself, than the body is the "I" seen from the outside, as it were, as a finite object of experience definitively bounded by other objects (or what is the same, enclosed by a skin). The body is thus the objectification of the "I" for itself. The habits of the...
  14. The Grey Man

    My Theory of Everything, Expressed in Layman's Terms

    All of these are methodological rules, which are subordinate to the criterion of falsifiability in Popper's system. The theory remains a theory because it is a universal statement about ravens from which falsifiable statements about particular ravens may be deducted. It may not be a particularly...
  15. The Grey Man

    My Theory of Everything, Expressed in Layman's Terms

    It was a digression and I identified it as such. I wasn't trying to sell you anything. These arguments ad hominem are becoming tiresome. Your consciousness gives unity to the plurality of things of which you are conscious; realistic thinking generalizes this relation to notional objects in...
  16. The Grey Man

    My Theory of Everything, Expressed in Layman's Terms

    My description of as a receiver of transmissions from the senses was not meant to serve as an alternative to your materialistic explanation of consciousness, but to illustrate the Kantian notion that the mind contributes the formal aspect of consciousness whereas sensibility provides the...
  17. The Grey Man

    My Theory of Everything, Expressed in Layman's Terms

    Yes, Kant was, notwithstanding his transcendental (or critical) idealism, a realist. He thought we only knew appearances, phenomena, but he also thought that there was something appearing, a thing in itself, though we can't say anything about it except it is such that it thus appears to us when...
  18. The Grey Man

    My Theory of Everything, Expressed in Layman's Terms

    We were talking about experience and whether it was objective or subjective (or if the question even made sense); now you’re talking about empirical objects and whether they’re real or not. These are different questions. My answer to the first question, as I said before, is that it doesn’t make...
  19. The Grey Man

    My Theory of Everything, Expressed in Layman's Terms

    I'm sowing no more skepticism than is required for the scientific method to function. Karl Popper, the man who pointed out the essential role that falsification plays in empirical science, was a materialist and an atheist, and my only disagreement with him that I've expressed in this thread is...
  20. The Grey Man

    My Theory of Everything, Expressed in Layman's Terms

    This is precisely Popper’s (and Fries’s) point. Reasonable belief and reasonable doubt are not mathematical inferences, but psychological motives for denying and affirming the truth of statements. To say that we are reasonably convinced that dinosaurs roamed the Earth millions of years ago is to...
  21. The Grey Man

    My Theory of Everything, Expressed in Layman's Terms

    Karl Popper and the Friesian Trilemma Karl Popper, for those of you who are unfamiliar with him, is one of the most prominent philosophers of the 20th century and the most important commentator on the scientific method since Bacon. His chief epistemological work, The Logic of Scientific...
  22. The Grey Man

    Moby Dick

    There is evidence that Melville was inspired by that English polymath of the 17th century, Thomas Browne, a man of immense learning and even greater curiosity who was interested in everything from mineralogy to botany to zoology to history and geography to medicine to philology to astronomy and...
  23. The Grey Man

    The Excellence of G.E. Moore

    I forgot that Schopenhauer's deduction of the will wasn't a priori at all, but, like Hume's analysis of all human propositions into descriptive "is" statements and prescriptive "ought" statements, it is derived from his own experience. Reflecting upon the world, he found that all of his...
  24. The Grey Man

    Othello (1604)

    Othello is good. I prefer Hamlet. It's my favourite work of fiction of all time, for so many reasons that I could spend all day trying to explain them. For now, I will satisfy myself by mentioning its agile allusions to the relationship between appearance and reality. The perennial philosophical...
  25. The Grey Man

    The Excellence of G.E. Moore

    I thought that the merit of Schulze was that he showed that Kant, by asserting that the synthesis of the understanding is caused by the Thing-in-Itself, he contradicted himself by applying to the Thing-in-Itself a category that is supposed to apply only to the synthetic representation (there is...
  26. The Grey Man

    Compensation for saving a life.

    @Minuend I haven't been sufficiently clear. We do place value on other people's lives, but it is only a relative value, an extrinsic value. There is a limit to how much of our property we're willing to invest to save someone, but this is not because that person somehow isn't worth saving. It's...
  27. The Grey Man

    The Excellence of G.E. Moore

    I agree. Like G.E. Moore, Reichenbach knew how to make himself understood and didn't hide his thoughts behind ambiguous phrasing and obscurantist verbiage. In this sense, this is the least inappropriate place to talk about him. Regarding Euclid's axioms, it may be that most of them were...
  28. The Grey Man

    Wilfrid Sellars: the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

    This thread is not about my conception of God, which, by the way, is almost certainly not what you have in mind when you speak of a self-contradicting "sky daddy." My argument is merely that we have immediate knowledge of things through experience. We don't know where did our experience come...
  29. The Grey Man

    Wilfrid Sellars: the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

    "I" might be entirely simulated, yes, but the fact remains that this subjective representation of unknown provenance is what makes knowledge possible. If you can doubt the concrete objects right in front of your face, then you can doubt those experiences which serve as evidence that you are not...
  30. The Grey Man

    Wilfrid Sellars: the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

    @DoIMustHaveAnUsername? introduced the thought of Wilfrid Sellars to me some time ago and, though I originally rejected his "Myth of the Given"—the notion that our beliefs are not grounded in immediate knowledge given by sensory experience—due to my own foundationalist conviction that beliefs...
  31. The Grey Man

    does time= death?

    Humans have always decided the difference between "up" and "down" by referring to the solid ground under our feet. The Earth is below us, the sky above us. Simple enough. Things are not so straightforward with space's husband, time. The difference between backward and forward in time, or between...
  32. The Grey Man

    Compensation for saving a life.

    Because life is the condition of the possibility of value. You can't value life because it is precisely living, being an organism with a will of your own, that gives you the ability to value things at all. Break this organic structure down, and the will dissipates with it—there is no more...
  33. The Grey Man

    Is Socratic Philosophy Possible?

    Plato's theory of forms, in its various forms, has been one of the most, if not the most persistent school of metaphysical thought in the history of Western civilization. Ever since its systematization and synthesis with nascent Christianity by the Church Fathers in the early centuries of our...
  34. The Grey Man

    Compensation for saving a life.

    A precedent for mercenaries collecting taxes on other people for life for doing the decent thing and helping them in times of profound distress? I guess I find this idea repugnant, whereas assigning a monetary value to life itself is just absurd.
  35. The Grey Man

    Why logical types have poor social skills although social stuff has a logical structure

    Logical types struggle with social situations for the same reason they struggle with everything else in life: because there's a difference between thinking cogently about a thing and actually doing that thing. No amount of reasoning, however acute, will turn you into a social adept if you lack...
  36. The Grey Man

    Selection for Societal Sanity

    I played MGS2 years ago and I don't remember it being this profound. "I'll decide for myself what to believe and what to pass on!" This has been my response to the increasingly politically-motivated construction of what is "known" mediately through public intelligence dissemination: to retreat...
  37. The Grey Man

    Compensation for saving a life.

    Can one have values at all without being alive? And, if not, how can one decide whether one values being alive more than not being dead? How can you measure two objects against each other if the measuring stick can't move from one to the other?
  38. The Grey Man

    Compensation for saving a life.

    Life is not a commercial good. The difference between a live body and a dead body is not one of degree, but of kind. No superadded quantity of energy or money will bring a mere aggregation of matter to life if it does not partake in the sui generis emergent form that identifies it as a discrete...
  39. The Grey Man

    Consciousness as Cosmic Sex

    Yes, I think so! This theory is closely related to what Reichenbach (an empiricist thinker with whose work I recently became acquainted) called the "functional conception of knowledge," which attributes to knowledge the function of predicting the future by enumerative induction. This theory can...
  40. The Grey Man

    How do you arrive at you morality?

    David Hume's position is the correct one. Matters of value cannot be inferred from matters of fact. Now, this doesn't mean that there are no matters of value, just that they are not publicly demonstrable, like the propositions of science, but private objects of introspection. Specifically, they...
  41. The Grey Man

    What is space really?

    There's Kantianism and there's Kantianism. Kant the practical philosopher was a Protestant workaholic who thought he could justify his workaholism and enforce it on everyone around him by means of a "categorical imperative" (what Schopenhauer later called his "sceptre of wooden iron" in one of...
  42. The Grey Man

    The Excellence of G.E. Moore

    In this thread (and I should have done this a long time ago), I'm going to take a break from shaking my fist at Anglo-American university philosophy in general to bring the forum's attention to a certain Cambridge professor who embodied what I consider to be the attributes of an excellent...
  43. The Grey Man

    What is space really?

    If by "I," you mean your consciousness and not your body, then your argument is equivalent to Kant's. He claimed that space arose from the synthesis of sense-data by the a priori categories of the understanding such as community and causality, which is indispensable to human cognition in...
  44. The Grey Man

    What is space really?

    Your body exists in space, in community with other physical objects, but you do not. The difference between your body and you can be compared to the picture taken by a camera and the camera itself. If we point the camera at a mirror, it can take a picture of itself, but it is not that picture...
  45. The Grey Man

    is the brain the turing machine

    Yes, it's tempting to think of the mind as a quiet stream that flows in a straight line, for simplicity's sake, but it's more like a seething, tempestuous lake in which more or less stable currents emerge stochastically.
  46. The Grey Man

    Determinism the end of morality and free will?

    I was actually surprised by how much of Reichenbach's Rise of Scientific Philosophy I agreed with, given how impressed I was with Schopenhauer, who explicitly rejected the sort of scientific materialism advocated in that book. For example, Reichenbach's anti-cognitivist treatment of ethics is, I...
  47. The Grey Man

    Determinism the end of morality and free will?

    I have always taken Goethe's side against Newton in this controversy. Light is not electromagnetic radiation because the EM radiation is just part of the physical system that makes light possible. The other part is the visual apparatus of animals, which process the waves into something that they...
  48. The Grey Man

    Determinism the end of morality and free will?

    The question of whether there are meaningful synthetic a priori propositions in addition to analytic a priori and synthetic a posteriori ones has been bothering me for a while. If not, then, we end up with the thesis of logical positivism: that those propositions alone are meaningful which refer...
  49. The Grey Man

    What makes a human free.

    If we're talking about freedom in a loose, political sense, this is close to how I would define it as well. If I can choose between work and leisure, between an active life and a contemplative life, according to my personal preference without being forced into one or the other by economic...
  50. The Grey Man

    Determinism the end of morality and free will?

    "Nothing exists until it is measured." -Bohr Can something exist that is not an object of empirical observation? According to Bohr, the answer is no, since it is observation (the reciprocal relationship between subject and object that has served as the backbone of most epistemological theories...
Top Bottom