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LPolaright
10th-November-2010, 08:16 AM
I didn't really know where to put this theory of mine (actually more of an experience) but it seemed to fit here.

We all know that we sense the world outside through our 5 sensors. But we also know that when you block one of the sensors your other sensing capabilities will be heightened, for example - DareDevil (I just love fictional characters, they present ideas to the extreme).

But what happens when you actually "mask" one of your sensing capabilities? To answer the question we need to understand better my definition of "masking":
Masking means you are sensing not to your full capacity because you are blocking it partially artificially.

Masking could be everything:
- Clothing that blocks most of your skin
- Music (even a full volumed one) in your ears
- Sunglasses
- Chewing gum


As of lately I started to feel the effects of masking more and more, and here is a personal example of it:

I am a musician, but not only I play instruments I also listen to them thoroughly and extensively... In the modern ages (which is now), you can actually listen to music everywhere you go, and that is exactly what I do.

I bought my first MP3 when I was 13 (5 years ago, back when they were really expensive and not very cost effective - 256 mb MP3 cost around 230$) and then I started to abuse it. I've been listening to it when I was on my way to school (I took a school bus that drove around for 2 hours), when I was in school breaks and whenever I could just put those comfortable earphones in my head.

And so I continued, I use it up to 5 hours a day, everyday with no exceptions - never. And today when I was walking to work I decided not to put music, just because I was too lazy to get it out from the bag...

The difference overwhelmed me in a way I couldn't imagine - I walked and I saw details that never caught my eye, my Se woke up alongside my Si... (It's important to notice that my Ni and Ne never ceased to work even while listening to music)
Suddenly I saw a fountain that I never saw before, actually it was kind of scary knowing that I missed so much details about the road I take to work everyday!


What that example shows us is the fact that removing the masking could have enormous impacts on the way we will sense and perceive the out world. Usually the cognitive functions show it best.
When removing the masking you will start using your Se and Si more and you will work less with your Ni and Ne.

Now, I'm not revealing something ground breaking - actually it was known to us ages ago. But we seem to be forgetful of that fact because of the many distractions in the modern world. Things that we use for everyday affect us in ways we never thought before.

What I truly want to discuss is whether or not there is potential in use of intentional masking in order to heighten certain senses, for example wear gloves and sunglasses in order to activate our Ni and Ne to a greater extent.

Also as a mentalist I can see the realm of possibilities endless with this effect - the fact that whenever I want to I can just remove my gloves and maybe even more pieces of clothing in order to fully comprehend small details and then putting them back on in order to connect between them and get some hidden patterns.

This effect probably has a name, but Wikipedia has not yet invented a way for us to type a text that describes an effect while it will seek for it. I also doubt they used the same definitions - like "masking" so I can't look for it using sentences in google.

What do you think?

shoeless
10th-November-2010, 09:00 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sensory_deprivation

now i understand that there's a difference between deprivation (cutting off all stimuli to a sense) and "masking" (such as listening to music or whatever), but i think it's the same basic principle.

fun fact, if you deprive your senses fully and for a long enough period of time, you can start to hallucinate. see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ganzfeld_effect

LPolaright
10th-November-2010, 11:00 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sensory_deprivation

now i understand that there's a difference between deprivation (cutting off all stimuli to a sense) and "masking" (such as listening to music or whatever), but i think it's the same basic principle.


It is the same basic principle, question is what can you do with that principle?
I'm interested in out of the box thinking incorporated with that principal.

fun fact, if you deprive your senses fully and for a long enough period of time, you can start to hallucinate. see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ganzfeld_effect

Interesting... No need to get LSD O:

dark
11th-November-2010, 02:04 AM
I have spent about 18 years of my life with a cataract in my right eye, my vision was stunned badly, I had no depth perception, it all started when I was four, and last year I had the cataract removed, the government can do some good. But because of some mechanical failure I have to wait until this coming year until they can get another fund to place a lense in my eye etc. long story, but I have an afaik contact lense, and now I can actaully see through that eye. When I first got it I started noticing things I never could see before, guess my Se/Si started functioning from over excitement. It scared the hell out of me before, the world looked so much different, there was actaully stuff in it. But I get overwhelmed in it so I take my contact out sometimes to go back to normal, and my Ne works over time. It starts piecing random things together, such as this, when I wake up I put contact in, go to school, experience some cool stuff, come back home take it out and the world of possibilities opens up to me, so yes this is a viable theory, very realistic, atleast for me it is.