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shoeless
19th-November-2009, 05:26 PM
i've just realized something. with all my intellectual interest in humanity, i never really thought about studying culture much. my focus is usually on a smaller scale, individuals and stuff.

but some cultures are really interesting -- i'm quite partial to the indian and the native american cultures myself (and yes, i am talking red dots and casinos, respectively). unfortunatlely i haven't done as much individual study as i'd like; mainly i never think about it when i have free time. but i recently stumbled across this:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raksha_Bandhan

and i think it's really cool. it makes me want to look more into the indian culture, and appreciate them for more than their delicious curries.

but anyway. what cultures interest you, if any, and why? and if you're not particularly interested in culture, why aren't you?

jus' wondrin'.

on another fun note, how do you feel about your own, native culture? america makes me a sad, sad little panda sometimes -- at least in the modern era -- and, i dunno. i'd like to learn a different language and like, totally integrate myself into a different culture, some day. just to see what it's like.

Subotai
19th-November-2009, 06:41 PM
At the moment i'm very interested in japanese culture and i'm trying to learn how to read and write Japanese ( please send me a good site if you know one )

My own culture is a bit of a mixture of french and dutch but i like it.

Nicholas A. A. E.
19th-November-2009, 07:46 PM
america makes me a sad, sad little panda sometimes -- at least in the modern era -- and, i dunno. i'd like to learn a different language and like, totally integrate myself into a different culture, some day. just to see what it's like.
I definitely agree with all of that.

You mentioned Indian culture, I wonder if you know the answer to this. I've been curious why a lot of modern mathematical concepts appeared very early in India. And there's a crap ton of cool mathematicians out of there. Aryabhata, Brahmagupta, Ramanujan. Do you know what the cultural deal is there?

del
20th-November-2009, 06:00 AM
I've done some teaching in Nepal and India, so I was actually there for the Raksha festival this year. I went with my friend to his family's village and watched the little ritual where they give each other sweets and the sister puts the tilaka on the brother's forehead. There was a big dinner for the whole family that night and I slept on a mat in some hut. Fun times.

Though the best was Indra Jatra in Kathmandu. It's a Newar festival where a long line of people pull these huge carts with statues on them go through the city and end up in Durbar Square, where they proceed to sing and dance and cause all sorts of mischief. I was with a Newar friend, and we'd both just done a ridiculous amount of drinking, so I thought I was imagining half this shit but I am pretty sure a portion of the festival was devoted to a ritual where men dressed up as women and danced with these crazy masks and fake swords. We saw a bunch of guys with these HUGE khurkis that looked absolutely vicious, and the next morning I read in the paper that like 6 cops got shanked so I decided not to attend the second day of the festival, lol.

As for the OP, I guess I'm ok with American culture. One thing you don't really realize is how violent American media is -- I mean, we all know it's violent, but the degree to which it's violent is kind of crazy. Also what we call "religion" isn't really comparable to what some other cultures would consider religion.

That said, we are more open about sex than many places (which is a good thing, IMO), and we do have better work ethic, believe it or not. Eh, I dunno, a lot of things aren't good or bad, just different.

That said, in my experience people are more alike than different.

typondis
27th-November-2009, 04:30 AM
Shoeless.....eat me!.....hah hah hah hah hah. I'm eaten.

Anyways, the way you word it things at least implies this idea that American/Western culture is lesser or something in the scheme of culture, and that older cultures are actually cultural.

Whether they know it, humans are always interested in culture. It's largely, and partly, what determines their identity. Whatever culture(s), it's always something.

Interest in, and identification with, are two different things.

nemo
27th-November-2009, 05:24 AM
At the moment i'm very interested in japanese culture and i'm trying to learn how to read and write Japanese ( please send me a good site if you know one )


I'm into Japanese culture as well! Mainly the popular culture, but sometime in the future I'll probably go into Japanese cultural history stuff too. And I'm sorry, I don't have any good websites for you, Subotai. What I did (and maybe what you might want to do) was find some Hiragana and Katakana charts, learnt them, immersed myself in a lot of Japanese stuff like music, TV shows and manga, and read stuff about the grammar. That's my biggest problem actually, the grammar, since I'm teaching myself and grammar is hard to teach to yourself. If you want to though, maybe we could help each other out or something? Moo.

Just today, I somehow came across an article about Spanish surnames and first names. 'Twas very interesting. I also take an interest in Russian culture, perhaps because I don't know that much about it. And I like snow. =]

About my own culture. IMO, Australia doesn't have much culture. There is stuff about values and stuff, but...well...I guess what I mean is that there's not really any...'intelligent' culture. Oh crap. How can I explain that without sounding derogarotory(SP)? Gah. I'm digging a hole for myself. What I mean is, Australia's not really a 'brain' country, which can be seen as good or bad. The values of Australia from what I perceive is more sports, having fun, being open and welcoming, etc. etc. The last one seems to be kind of going down. But I don't think that's just Australia. It's more of the whole world turning making people have a 'do it for yourself' mindset.

I also have a Chinese background, and old Chinese culture does interest me, the literature and arts especially. My Chinese isn't good enough to read the important books and stuff, but the poems from the Tang and Song dynasties are beautiful, yet simply written. That's the beauty I guess. Nowadays, everything seems to be over-complicated.

Culture and linguistics are awesome fields, and they should be well-kept for the future generations to learn and love. It does depend, though.

Nicholas A. A. E.
27th-November-2009, 11:12 AM
Anyways, the way you word it things at least implies this idea that American/Western culture is lesser or something in the scheme of culture, and that older cultures are actually cultural.

This kind of annoys me. Or, anyway, I disagree with it. I was talking to this girl once, and it came up that I was Cuban (half-Cuban, anyway). She's black - Eritrean, I think. Anyway, she exclaims, "Oh, you have culture!" Or something like that, and we got in a mock-argument over whether Americans have culture. Yeah. :borg0:

Inappropriate Behavior
27th-November-2009, 02:14 PM
The US does have it's own culture. A most unique culture in fact. However it lacks the perception of dare I say, and ethnic purity that India or Japan is perceived to have. India does have varying regional cultures and traditions that generally isn't seen by casual outside observers. The US is much the same but it just isn't seen as easily by either insiders or outsiders.

The US is still young and doesn't have the longstanding traditions that other nations might have. It's also far more varied in terms of the types of people who live here and thus it is often perceived as being a hodge-podge of different cultures but that is false. There are many things that are uniquely 'American'. Maybe not all good things, but they are ours and a big part of our identity. American exceptionalism, what other nation has anything like it? The fact that we generally see ourselves as extra-ordinary is in and of it's self part of our culture.

typondis
28th-November-2009, 12:06 AM
This kind of annoys me. Or, anyway, I disagree with it. I was talking to this girl once, and it came up that I was Cuban (half-Cuban, anyway). She's black - Eritrean, I think. Anyway, she exclaims, "Oh, you have culture!" Or something like that, and we got in a mock-argument over whether Americans have culture. Yeah. :borg0:

You're misunderstanding the context, dear. My statement was regarding shoeless's wording, and perhaps perception as well as a large portion of Americans (particularly caucasian ones).

There was nothing beyond that. Certainly it can go different ways, depending on the context/those involved.



The US does have it's own culture. A most unique culture in fact. However it lacks the perception of dare I say, and ethnic purity that India or Japan is perceived to have.....

Yes, yes, of course.

Nicholas A. A. E.
28th-November-2009, 01:14 AM
I wasn't criticizing your point in particular, it just reminded me of what others have said. I know my post is ambiguous on that dichotomy, but it's what I meant anyway.

typondis
28th-November-2009, 10:26 PM
I wasn't criticizing your point in particular, it just reminded me of what others have said. I know my post is ambiguous on that dichotomy, but it's what I meant anyway.

<caresses head in lap> It's okay. Expressing oneself is the important part of things.

shoeless
28th-November-2009, 10:42 PM
uh. i'm aware america has culture. i'm just not a big fan of it.

what part of my wording made that confusing..?

typondis
29th-November-2009, 07:02 AM
uh. i'm aware america has culture. i'm just not a big fan of it.

what part of my wording made that confusing..?

MMMmmmm. I skipped that last bit. Need an elucidation, though.

shoeless
29th-November-2009, 09:45 AM
elucidation? seriously? do you whack off to a thesaurus or something?

i don't know what you want me to elucidate for you. why i don't like american culture?

well, america is young. it doesn't have any ancient-rooted culture, which is what i find the most interesting -- all the traditions and stuff that's been passed down for hundreds of years -- it's baffling to me, and i love it. america doesn't have that. we don't have any stable traditions. our culture changes dramatically every decade, and not generally for the better, from where i'm standing. but then again, i'm not the biggest fan of the overly-technologized (is that a word? probably not) world; i feel sort of robbed, in a way.

but that's just me.

typondis
30th-November-2009, 11:39 PM
elucidation? seriously? do you whack off to a thesaurus or something?

Pish. (that's like 'pshaw', but I made it up, ad-hoc) And this is an INTP forum.....



i don't know what you want me to elucidate for you. why i don't like american culture?

well, america is young. it doesn't have any ancient-rooted culture, which is what i find the most interesting -- all the traditions and stuff that's been passed down for hundreds of years -- it's baffling to me, and i love it. america doesn't have that. we don't have any stable traditions. our culture changes dramatically every decade, and not generally for the better, from where i'm standing. but then again, i'm not the biggest fan of the overly-technologized (is that a word? probably not) world; i feel sort of robbed, in a way.

but that's just me.

That was exactly the kind of thing I wanted to hear. Success.